Popular Science Monthly and World's Advance, Volume 62 (Google eBook)

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McClure, Phillips and Company, 1903 - Technology
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Page 442 - I call therefore a complete and generous Education that which fits a man to perform justly, skilfully and magnanimously all the offices both private and public of peace and war.
Page 135 - For the several employments and offices of our fellows, we have twelve that sail into foreign countries under the names of other nations (for our own we conceal), who bring us the books and abstracts, and patterns of experiments of all other parts. These we call merchants of light.
Page 134 - We have also divers strange and artificial echoes, reflecting the voice many times, and as it were tossing it: and some that give back the voice louder than it came, some shriller, and some deeper ; yea, some rendering the voice differing in the letters or articulate sound from that they receive. We have also means to convey sounds in trunks and pipes, in strange lines and distances.
Page 533 - States, to which the youth of fortune and talents from all parts thereof might be sent for the completion of their Education in all the branches of polite literature; in arts and Sciences, in acquiring knowledge in the principles of Politics and good Government; and (as a matter of infinite Importance in my judgment) by associating with each other, and forming friendships in Juvenile years, be enabled to free themselves in a proper degree from those local prejudices and habitual jealousies which...
Page 135 - Then after divers meetings and consults of our whole number, to consider of the former labours and collections, we have three that take care out of them to direct new experiments, of a higher light, more penetrating into Nature than the former.
Page 129 - The end of our foundation is the knowledge of causes, and secret motions of things; and the enlarging of the bounds of human empire, to the effecting of all things possible.
Page 532 - I proceed after this recital, for the more correct understanding of the case, to declare that, as it has always been a source of serious regret with me to see the youth of these United States sent to foreign countries for the purpose of education, often before their minds were formed, or they had imbibed any adequate ideas of the happiness of their own ; contracting too frequently not only habits of dissipation and extravagance, but principles unfriendly to republican government...
Page 532 - That as it has always been a source of serious regret with me, to see the youth of these United States sent to foreign countries for the purpose of education, often before their minds were formed, or they had imbibed any adequate ideas of the happiness of their own ; contracting too frequently, not only habits of dissipation and extravagance, but principles unfriendly to republican government, and to the true and genuine liberties of mankind ; which thereafter are rarely overcome.
Page 130 - We have high, towers, the highest about half a mile in height, and some of them likewise set upon high mountains, so that the vantage of the hill with the tower is, in the highest of them, three miles at least. And these places we call the upper region; accounting the air between the high places and the low as a middle region.
Page 189 - ... the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Institute of Mining Engineers, The American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the American Institute of Electrical Engineers for notable scientific or industrial achievement...

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