Biomaterials: An Introduction (Google eBook)

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Springer Science & Business Media, Jul 23, 2007 - Medical - 576 pages
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First published in 1992, this revision of a popular textbook features completely updated coverage. The burgeoning field of biomaterials has become strongly interdisciplinary, encompassing new materials and their interactions with the biochemical environment. With sixty-years of combined experience, the authors have learned to emphasize the fundamental materials science, structure-property relationships, and biological responses as a foundation for a wide array of biomaterials applications. The extensively rewritten and updated Biomaterials: An Introduction, Third Edition, includes a new chapter on tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, approximately 1900 references to additional reading, extensive tutorial materials on new developments in spinal implants and fixation techniques and theory, systematic coverage of orthopedic implants, and expanded treatment of ceramic materials and implants. All figures have been redrawn and more examples and problems have been included to provide the student with hands-on experience with the concepts.
  

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Contents

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Page 2 - ... growing chains, initiated by free radical agents. Biocompatibility: Acceptance of an artificial implant by the surrounding tissues and as a whole. The implant should be compatible with tissues in terms of mechanical, chemical, surface, and pharmacological properties. Biomaterials: Synthetic materials used to replace part of a living system or to function in intimate contact with living tissue.
Page 29 - Linear polymers such as polyvinyls, polyamides, and polyesters are much easier to crystallize than the cross-linked or branched polymers. However, they cannot be crystallized 100% as with metals. Instead they become semicrystalline polymers. The arrangement of chains in crystalline regions is believed to be a combination of folded and extended chains. The chain folds, which are seemingly more difficult to form, are necessary to explain observed single crystal structures in which the crystal thickness...

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