The Great Modern French Stories: A Chronological Anthology (Google eBook)

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S. S. Van Dine
Boni and Liveright, 1917 - French fiction - 409 pages
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Page 267 - The peasant was fairly stunned. He understood at last. He was accused of having sent the wallet back by a confederate, an accomplice. He tried to protest. The whole table began to laugh. He could not finish his dinner, but left the inn amid a chorus of jeers. He returned home, shamefaced and indignant, suffocated by wrath, by confusion, and all the more cast down because, with his...
Page 334 - The elevation of the levels, the proportionate capacity of the various parts, the gradient for the brazen reservoirs to which the distribution pipes were to be fixed I had gone into every detail, and decided everything for myself with the assistance of mechanical experts. I had drawn up regulations for the superintendents so as to prevent individuals from making unauthorized depredations. The architects and the workmen had their instructions. I gave orders for the commencement of operations....
Page 266 - He passed on, button-holed by every one, himself button-holing his acquaintances, beginning over and over again his tale and his protestations, showing his pockets turned inside out to prove that he had nothing. They said to him :
Page 335 - are profoundly attached to their ancient customs. They suspected you, unreasonably I admit, of a desire to abolish their laws and change their usages. Do not resent it, Pontius, if I say that you did not always act in such a way as to disperse their unfortunate illusion. It gratified you, despite your habitual selfrestraint, to play upon their fears, and, more than once have I seen you betray in their presence the contempt with which their beliefs and religious ceremonies inspired you. You irritated...
Page 63 - I answered, laughingly, from the threshold. I went home, delighted with my acquisition. With the idea of putting it to profitable use as soon as possible, I placed the foot of the divine Princess Hermonthis upon a heap of papers scribbled over with verses, in themselves an undecipherable mosaic work of erasures ; articles freshly begun ; letters forgotten, and posted in the table drawer instead of the letter-box, an error to which absent-minded people are peculiarly liable. The effect was charming,...
Page 330 - ... execution the leaders of the rebellion. But you are aware, Lamia, in what strait dependence I was kept by the proconsul Vitellius, who governed Syria not in, but against the interests of Rome, and looked upon the provinces of the empire as .territories which could be farmed out to tetrarchs. The head-men among the Samaritans, in their resentment against me, came and fell at his feet lamenting.
Page 71 - If you were even only two thousand years old,' replied the ancient king, 'I would willingly give you the princess, but the disproportion is too great; and, besides, we must give our daughters husbands who will last well. You do not know how to preserve yourselves any longer. Even those who died only fifteen centuries ago are already no more than a handful of dust. Behold, my flesh is solid as basalt, my bones are bars of steel! 'I will be present on the last day of the world with the same body and...
Page 149 - ... she will not notice anything." ' ' You might send some one to get it, " I said. "No, no! my servant stayed at Ille, and I don't trust these people here. Twelve hundred francs' worth of diamonds! that might be too much of a temptation for more than one of them. Besides, what would they all think of my absent-mindedness ? They would make too much fun of me. They would call me the statue's husband. However, I trust that no one will steal it. Luckily, all my knaves are afraid of the idol. They...
Page 59 - THEOPHILE GAUTIER I had entered, in an idle mood, the shop of one of those curiosity venders who are called marchands de bric-a-brac in that Parisian argot which is so perfectly unintelligible elsewhere in France. You have doubtless glanced occasionally through the windows of some of these shops, which have become so numerous now that it is fashionable to buy antiquated furniture, and that every petty stock broker thinks he must have his chambre au moyen age.
Page 263 - ... together, with frightened eyes and scarlet combs. They listened to offers, adhered to their prices, short of speech and impassive of face; or else, suddenly deciding to accept the lower price offered, they would call out to the customer as he walked slowly away: "All right, Mast' Anthime. You can have it." Then, little by little, the square became empty, and when the Angelus struck midday those who lived too far away to go home betook themselves to the various inns. At Jourdain's the common room...

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