The Living Age ..., Volume 107 (Google eBook)

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Littell, Son, 1870
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Page 224 - Almighty GOD, unto Whom all hearts be open, all desires known, and from Whom no secrets are hid; Cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspiration of Thy HOLY SPIRIT, that we may perfectly love Thee, and worthily magnify Thy Holy Name; through CHRIST our LORD. Amen.
Page 218 - And are themselves the fools to those they fool ; Envied, yet how unenviable! what stings Are theirs! One breast laid open were a school Which would unteach mankind the lust to shine or rule : XLIV.
Page 349 - He either fears his fate too much, Or his deserts are small, Who fears to put it to the touch, To win or lose it all.
Page 178 - The reluctant pangs of abdicating royalty in Edward furnished hints, which Shakspeare scarcely improved in his Richard the Second ; and the death-scene of Marlowe's king moves pity and terror beyond any scene, ancient or modern, with which I am acquainted.
Page 55 - That slightly shakes his parting guest by the hand, And with his arms outstretch'd, as he would fly, Grasps in the comer : welcome ever smiles, And farewell goes out sighing. O, let not virtue seek Remuneration for the thing it was ; For beauty, wit, High birth, vigour of bone, desert in service, Love, friendship, charity, are subjects all To envious and calumniating time.
Page 262 - Origen rightly judges. And the Apocalypse of St. John is the majestic image of a high and stately tragedy, shutting up and intermingling her solemn scenes and acts with a sevenfold chorus of hallelujahs and harping symphonies : and this my opinion the grave authority of Pareus, commenting that book, is sufficient to confirm.
Page 144 - I was not ever thus, nor prayed that Thou Shouldst lead me on. I loved to choose and see my path, but now Lead Thou me on!
Page 403 - All, all is silent rocks and woods, All still and silent far and near ! Only the Ass, with motion dull, Upon the pivot of his skull Turns round his long left ear.
Page 216 - That which is most within me, could I wreak My thoughts upon expression, and thus throw Soul, heart, mind, passions, feelings, strong or weak, All that I would have sought, and all I seek, Bear, know, feel, and yet breathe into one word, And that one word were Lightning, I would speak But as it is, I live and die unheard, "With a most voiceless thought, sheathing it as a sword.
Page 178 - O, thou art fairer than the evening air Clad in the beauty of a thousand stars...

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