The Vanishing Voter: Public Involvement in an Age of Uncertainty (Google eBook)

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Sep 9, 2009 - Political Science - 241 pages
3 Reviews
From the award-winning author of Out of Order—named the best political science book of the last decade by the American Political Science Association—comes this landmark book about why Americans don’t vote.

Based on more than 80,000 interviews, The Vanishing Voter investigates why—despite a better educated citizenry, the end of racial barriers to voting, and simplified voter registration procedures—the percentage of voters has steadily decreased to the point that the United States now has nearly the lowest voting rate in the world. Patterson cites the blurring of differences between the political parties, the news media’s negative bias, and flaws in the election system to explain this disturbing trend while suggesting specific reforms intended to bring Americans back to the polls. Astute, far-reaching, and impeccably researched, The Vanishing Voter engages the very meaning of our relationship to our government.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
  

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Review: The Vanishing Voter: Public Involvement in an Age of Uncertainty

User Review  - Franziska - Goodreads

It wasn't a bad read, pretty short, but probably dead boring unless you care about why people aren't voting. Read full review

Review: The Vanishing Voter: Public Involvement in an Age of Uncertainty

User Review  - Elise - Goodreads

Sad but true. Read full review

Contents

Acknowledgments
CHAPTER ONE
CHAPTER TWO
CHAPTER THREE
CHAPTER FOUR
CHAPTER FIVE
CHAPTER SIX
Afterword to the Vintage Edition
AppendixTHE VANISHING VOTER PROJECT
Notes
Bibliography
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Thomas E. Patterson is the Bradlee Professor of Government and the Press at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. For many years he taught at Syracuse University. He is the author of several other books on politics and the media, including Out of Order, which won the American Political Science Association’s 2002 Doris Graber Award for the best book in the field of political communication, and The Unseeing Eye, which was named one of the fifty most influential books of the past half century in the field of public opinion by the American Association for Public Opinion Research. He lives in Brookline, Massachusetts.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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