A narrative of Italian travels in Persia, in the fifteenth and sixteen centuries, Volume 49, Issues 1-2 (Google eBook)

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Printed for the Hakluyt society, 1873 - Iran - 229 pages
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Page 206 - The name of God is forgotten throughout Persia and only that of Ismael remembered." "The Suffaveans fought like lions" is a phrase which repeatedly occurs in the pages of the Venetian travellers. Yet for all this, and the numbers and wide ramifications of the Order (" from the remotest West to the limits of Balkh and Bukhara...
Page 111 - This Sophi," he says a little further on', " is fair, handsome, and very pleasing ; not very tall, but of a light and well-framed figure ; rather stout than slight, with broad shoulders. His hair is reddish; he only wears moustachios, and uses his left hand instead of his right. He is as brave as a game-cock, and stronger than any of his lords ; in the archery contests, out of the ten apples that are knocked down, he knocks down seven ; while he is at his sport they play on various instruments and...
Page 206 - amiable as a girl, left-handed by nature, as lively as a fawn, and stronger than any of his lords," and says that " this Sophi is loved and reverenced by his people as a god, and especially by his soldiers, many of whom enter into battle without armour, expecting their master Ismael to watch over them in the fight.
Page x - William might be persuaded to do it; because he seems by his countenance to be so manly a man, that he will not refuse any peril that might come to his person to deliver his whole native country from so many and so great dangers as be now offered thereunto, if he might be made to understand them.
Page viii - ... deprived of his employment at court, and is said to have meditated the death of the queen ; but Bale says it was Gardiner whom he formed a design of murdering. Others think that he was concerned in Wyat's rebellion. It is certain that for some of these charges, he was committed to the Tower in 1553, together with William Winter and sir Nicholas Throgmorton. Wood says, " He was a man of a hot fiery spirit, had sucked in damnable principles by his frequent conversations with Christopher Goodman,...
Page 151 - ... into purchasing their silence also. We remained at Citracan from May 1st to August 10th, the feast of St. Lawrence. Citracan belongs to three sons of a brother of the present Emperor of those Tartars who inhabit the plains of Circassia and the country lying in the direction of Tana. In the heat of the summer they go towards the confines of Russia in search of fresh pasturage. These three brothers remain in Citracan a few months in the winter, but in the summer do like the rest. Citracan is a...
Page vii - London, and on account of his knowledge of modern languages, was made clerk of the council to king Edward VI. who soon after gave him a prebend of St. Paul's, and the living of Presthend in South Wales. According to Strype, he acted very unfairly in procuring the prebend, not being a spiritual person ; and the same objection undoubtedly rests against his other promotion. On the accession of queen Mary, he was deprived of his employment at court, and is said to have meditated the death of the queen...
Page 153 - ... tied them with a rope to the tail of a horse, which he drove to an island in the river, a distance of two bow shots. He then returned and took a Russian woman, and eventually Contarini himself, and also his horses. " This was the third day," he says, " I had not eaten, and when he (ie, the Tartar) gave me a little sour milk I received it with the greatest thanks, and thought it very good. A number of Tartar neatherds, who were on the island, collected round to look at him, no Christian having...
Page 18 - The modern science of war is utterly unknown to them ; they are ignorant of the principles of fortification, and of the arts of attack and defence. Their infantry are few and despicable. ' Their field artillery is chiefly composed of zambarooks, or small swivels, fired from the backs of camels.
Page vii - In 15*9, be was again in London, and on account of his knowledge of modern languages, was made clerk of the council to king Edward VI who soon after gave him a prebend of St. Paul's, and the living of Presthend in South Wales. According to Strype, he acted very unfairly in procuring the prebend, not being a spiritual person; and the eame objection undoubtedly rests against his other promotion.

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