The Address of the Hon. Wm. A. Graham on the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence of the 20th of May, 1775: Delivered at Charlotte, on the 4th Day of Feb'y, 1875, by Request of the Citizens of Mecklenburg County. With Accompanying Documents, Including Those Published by Order of the Legislature of North Carolina in the Year 1831 (Google eBook)

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E. J. Hale & Son, 1875 - Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence - 167 pages
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Page 134 - That we the citizens of Mecklenburg County do hereby dissolve the political bands which have connected us to the mother country and hereby absolve ourselves from all allegiance to the British Crown and abjure all political connection contract or association with that nation who have wantonly trampled on our rights and liberties and inhumanly shed the blood of American patriots at Lexington.
Page 134 - Congress, to the maintenance of which independence we solemnly pledge to each other our mutual cooperation, our lives, our fortunes and our most sacred honor. 4. Resolved, that as we now acknowledge the existence and control of no law or legal officer, civil or military, within this county, we do hereby ordain and adopt as a rule of life all, each and every of our former laws — wherein nevertheless the Crown of Great Britain never can be considered as holding rights, privileges, immunities, or...
Page 125 - Resolved, That the delegates for this Colony in the Continental Congress be impowered to concur with the delegates of the other Colonies in declaring Independency, and forming foreign alliances, reserving to this Colony the sole and exclusive right of forming a Constitution and laws for this Colony...
Page 130 - Resolved, That we, the citizens of Mecklenburg county, do hereby dissolve the political bands which have connected us to the mother country, and hereby absolve ourselves from all allegiance to the British Crown...
Page 105 - That whosoever directly or indirectly abetted, or in any way, form, or manner, countenanced, the unchartered and dangerous invasion of our rights, as claimed by Great Britain, is an enemy to this country, — to America, — and to the inherent and inalienable rights of man.
Page 116 - And you seem to think it genuine. I believe it spurious. I deem it to be a very unjustifiable quiz, like that of the volcano, so minutely related to us as having broken out in North Carolina, some half...
Page 109 - As all former laws are now suspended in this province, and the Congress have not yet provided others, we judge it necessary, for the better preservation of good order, to form certain rules and regulations for the internal government of this county, until laws shall be provided for us by the Congress.
Page 135 - ... to issue process, hear and determine all matters of controversy according to said adopted laws and to preserve peace, union and harmony in said county, and to use every exertion to spread the love of Country and fire of freedom throughout America, until a more general and organized government be established in this Province.
Page 107 - Resolved That we do hereby declare ourselves a free and independent people, are and of right ought to be a sovereign and selfgoverning association under the control of no power other than that of our God and the General Government of the Congress to the maintenance of which independence we solemnly pledge to each other our mutual co-operation our lives our fortunes and our most sacred honor.
Page 109 - Tuesday 5 in January, April, July, and October, at the Court-House, in Charlotte, to hear and determine all matters of Controversy for Sums exceeding Forty Shillings; also Appeals: And in Cases...

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