Magic, Miracles, and Religion: A Scientist's Perspective

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Ilkka Pyysiäinen
Rowman Altamira, Jan 1, 2004 - Religion - 277 pages
2 Reviews
Can scientists study religion? Ilkka Pyysiäinen says that they can. While the study of religion cannot be reduced to other disciplines, it must not ignore what other disciplines have learned about human thought and behavior. In this collection of essays, Pyysiäinen shows how findings from cognitive science can offer new directions to debates in religion. After providing a historical and theoretical overview of the cognitive science of religion, Pyysiäinen demonstrates how knowledge of the mind's workings can help deconstruct such concepts as "god," "ideology," "culture," "magic," "miracles," and "religion." For scholars of religion or for scholars of the mind-brain, Magic, Miracles, and Religion provides a helpful overview to this emerging field.
  

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Contents

III
1
IV
28
V
39
VI
53
VII
67
VIII
81
IX
90
X
113
XIII
160
XIV
172
XV
187
XVI
205
XVII
219
XVIII
232
XIX
269
XX
277

XI
135
XII
147

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Page 234 - human body" and "territory" in conceptualizing religion. In The Sacred and its Scholars: Comparative Methodologies for the Study of Primary Religious Data, 36-64.

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About the author (2004)

Ilkka Pyysiäinen was educated in theology and comparative religion at the University of Helsinki, Finland. He earned his Ph.D. in 1993 with a thesis on Buddhist mysticism. Since that he has dedicated himself for the exploration of religious cognition. He has published numerous articles and among his books are How Religion Works (2001) and Current Approaches in the Cognitive Science of Religion (edited with Veikko Anttonen, 2002). He works currently at the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies.

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