Gabriel's story

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Doubleday, Jan 1, 2001 - Fiction - 291 pages
20 Reviews
David Anthony Durham makes his literary debut with a haunting novel which, in the tradition of Cormac McCarthy'sAll the Pretty Horses, views the American West through a refreshingly original lens. Set in the 1870s, the novel tells the tale of Gabriel Lynch, an African American youth who settles with his family in the plains of Kansas. Dissatisfied with the drudgery of homesteading and growing increasingly disconnected from his family, Gabriel forsakes the farm for a life of higher adventure. Thus begins a forbidding trek into a terrain of austere beauty, a journey begun in hope, but soon laced with danger and propelled by a cast of brutal characters. Durham's accomplishment is not solely in telling one man's story. He also gives voice to a population seldom included in our Western lore and crafts a new poetry of the American landscape.Gabriel's Storyis an important addition to the mosaic of our nation's mythology.

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Review: Gabriel's Story

User Review  - Cath - Goodreads

Gripping. Still thinking about this one. Read full review

Review: Gabriel's Story

User Review  - Walt - Goodreads

The majority of this book is about a 15 year-old boy witnessing a bunch of cowboys he is riding with murder, maim, and rape...without protest on his part. In the end, after nearly drowning, he decides ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
13
Section 3
14
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

David Anthony Durham was born in 1969 to parents of Caribbean ancestry. He won the Zora Neale Hurston/Richard Wright Fiction Award in 1992 and received a MFA from the University of Maryland in 1996. He has lived and traveled widely throughout America and Europe. Durham, along with his wife and daughter, now divides his time between the United States and Scotland.

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