Skeleton Crew (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Jun 3, 1986 - Fiction - 576 pages
385 Reviews

Who could imagine...?

In this brilliant collection of twenty-two stories, Stephen King takes readers down paths that only he could imagine....

A supermarket becomes the place where humanity makes its last stand against unholy destruction...a trip to the attic turns into a journey to hell...a woman driver finds a very scary shortcut to paradise...an idyllic lake harbors a bottomless evil...and a desert island is the scene of the most terrifying struggle for survival ever waged.

Features the novella “The Mist”—Now a major motion picture


  

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User ratings

5 stars
135
4 stars
148
3 stars
78
2 stars
17
1 star
7

Good character development, good plot. - Goodreads
The ending is wrong. - Goodreads
Interesting premise though. - Goodreads
The Mist is story telling at its best and creepiest. - Goodreads
A much better story and a much better ending. - Goodreads
Good premise, still doesn't beat the mist though. - Goodreads

Review: Skeleton Crew

User Review  - Alison L. - Goodreads

King at his best. Read full review

Review: Skeleton Crew

User Review  - Bill - Goodreads

My favorite is Survive Type! Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
I
3
5
I The Coming of the Storm
II After the Storm Norton A Trip to Town
III The Coming of the Mist
IV The Storage Area Problems with the Generators What Happened to the BagBoy
V An Argument with Norton A Discussion Near the Beer Cooler Verification
VI Further Discussion Mrs Carmody Fortifications What Happened to the FlatEarth Society
VII The First Night
VIII What Happened to the Soldiers With Amanda A Conversation with Dan Miller
IX The Expedition to the Pharmacy
X The Spell of Mrs Carmody The Second Night in the Market The Final Confrontation
XI The End
Copyright

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About the author (1986)

Stephen King lives in Maine and Florida with his wife, novelist Tabitha King. He has written more than forty books and two hundred short stories. He has won the World Fantasy Award, several Bram Stoker awards, and the O. Henry Award for his story “The Man in the Black Suit,” and is the 2003 recipient of the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.

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