The Small Boat of Great Sorrows: A Novel (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Dec 18, 2007 - Fiction - 320 pages
16 Reviews
Vlado Petric, a former homicide detective in Sarajevo, is now living in exile, and making a meagre living working at a Berlin construction site, when an American investigator for the International War Crimes Tribunal recruits him to return home on a mission. The assignment sounds simple enough. He is to help capture an aging Nazi collaborator who has become a war profiteer. But nothing is simple in the Balkans: Petric is also being used as bait to lure his quarry into the open, and when the operation goes sour he is drawn across Europe into a dangerous labyrinth of secret identities, stolen gold, and horrifying discoveries about his own family’s past.

Intelligent and suspenseful, The Small Boat of Great Sorrows brings together chilling crimes, the lies people live and the cold facts of international politics into a masterful, electrifying thriller.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
  

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Review: The Small Boat of Great Sorrows (Vlado Petric #2)

User Review  - Elephant Bookstore - Goodreads

meh....not terrible, but the point of these books is lost on me. Read full review

Review: The Small Boat of Great Sorrows (Vlado Petric #2)

User Review  - Tom Wiebe - Goodreads

Source: LA Public Library. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
15
Section 2
34
Section 3
55
Section 4
68
Section 5
78
Section 6
93
Section 7
108
Section 8
116
Section 17
206
Section 18
215
Section 19
224
Section 20
229
Section 21
236
Section 22
243
Section 23
248
Section 24
253

Section 9
125
Section 10
134
Section 11
143
Section 12
146
Section 13
163
Section 14
173
Section 15
184
Section 16
195
Section 25
260
Section 26
264
Section 27
272
Section 28
283
Section 29
297
Section 30
302
Section 31
306
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Dan Fesperman is a journalist for The Baltimore Sun and served in its Berlin bureau, covering Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, and Serbia during their civil conflicts. He won the 1999 John Creasey Memorial Dagger Award for Lie in the Dark. A graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, he grew up in Charlotte, North Carolina, and now lives with his family in Baltimore, Maryland.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Bibliographic information