The Horse (Google eBook)

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World Publishing House, 1877 - Horses - 448 pages
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Page 378 - They form a good subatitute for grass, and an excellent alterative for horses out of condition. To sick and idle horses they render grain unnecessary, They are beneficial in all chronic diseases connected with breathing, and have a marked influence upon chronic cough and broken wind. They are serviceable in diseases of the skin, and in combination with oats they restore a worn horse much sooner than oats alone...
Page 235 - The next stage borders on delirium. The eye acquires a wild, haggard, and unnatural stare the pupil dilates his heedless and dreadful throes render approach to him quite perilous, he is an object not only of compassion but of apprehension, and seems fast hurrying to his end when all at once, in the midst of agonizing torments he stands quiet, as though every pain had left him and he were going to recover. His breathing becomes tranquillized his pulse sunk beyond all perception ...
Page 366 - ... shape given to it which it naturally acquires in a fortnight from the peculiar action of such a horse, the animal may not stumble quite so much ; or if the disease which produced the habit can be alleviated, some trifling good may be done, but in almost every case a stumbler should be got rid of, or put to slow and heavy work. If the latter alternative is adopted, he may trip as much as he pleases, for the weight of the load and the motion of the other horses will keep him upon his legs. WEAVING...
Page 190 - ... of the horse, should be wrapped, so as to cover the whole of the incision ; and the head of the horse should be tied up for several hours to prevent his rubbing the part against the manger. In bringing the edges of the wound together, and introducing the pin, care should be taken not to draw the skin too much from the neck, otherwise blood will insinuate itself between it and the muscles beneath, and cause an unsightly and sometimes troublesome swelling.* The blood should be received into a vessel,...
Page 396 - ... would have a right to recover the difference between the value of a sound horse and one with such defects as existed at the time of the warranty ; or he might return the horse and bring an action to recover the full...
Page 355 - Some saw his skill tried on a horse which could never before be brought to stand for a smith to shoe him. The day after Sullivan's half-hour lecture I went, not without some incredulity, to the smith's shop, with many other curious spectators, where we were eye-witnesses of the complete success of his art. This, too, had been a troop-horse; and it was supposed, not without reason, that after regimental discipline had failed no other would be found availing. I observed that the animal seemed afraid...
Page 397 - ... and he proceeds to say, that if it were in a worse state than it would have been if returned immediately after the discovery, the purchaser would have no defence to an action for the price of the article.
Page 295 - The moisture which that little takes up can be easily removed ; both the skin and the hair can be made perfectly dry before evaporation begins, or proceeds so far as to deprive the legs of their heat. It is the cold produced by evaporation that does all the mischief...
Page 349 - Setons are pieces of tape or cord, passed by means of an instrument resembling a large needle, either through abscesses or the base of ulcers, with deep sinuses, or between the skin and the muscular or other substances beneath. They are retained there by the ends being tied together, or by a knot in each end.
Page 355 - After a tete-a.tetc between him and the horse for about half an hour, during which little or no bustle was heard, the signal was made ; and upon opening the door, the horse was seen lying down, and the man by his side, playing familiarly with him, like a child with a puppy dog. From that time he was found perfectly willing to submit to discipline, however repugnant to his nature before.

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