Beyond Good and Evil (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Apr 29, 2003 - Philosophy - 240 pages
333 Reviews
This work dramatically rejects the tradition of Western thought with its notions of truth and God, good and evil. Nietzsche demonstrates that the Christian world is steeped in a false piety and infected with a "slave morality." With wit and energy, he turns from this critique to a philosophy that celebrates the present and demands that the individual imposes their own "will to power" upon the world.
  

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Incredible density of intriguing ideas and insights. - Goodreads
Nietzsche's writing style can be difficult to follow. - Goodreads
Nietzsche is a powerful and brilliant writer. - Goodreads
Added to that the prose is dense and confusing. - Goodreads
... a fascinating writing style. - Goodreads
strong writing by a defeated idealist. - Goodreads

Review: Beyond Good and Evil

User Review  - Derrick Flakoll - Goodreads

5 for prose, critique of received wisdom and exaltation of the human spirit, 3 (if that) for sexism and a callous tolerance for oppression. A deep well whose water is as rich as it is bitter -- and perhaps a bit poisonous in excess. Read full review

Review: Beyond Good and Evil

User Review  - Joel Voegeli - Goodreads

As a christian I found this book both challenging but encouraging. Challenging as it challenged what about I believed about Christianity but encouraging that the issues that I have with the concept of 'Church' are also issues that Nietzsche brought up. Read full review

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Copyright

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About the author (2003)

The philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche was born in Prussia in 1844. After the death of his father, a Lutheran minister, Nietzsche was raised from the age of five by his mother in a household of women. In 1869 he was appointed Professor of Classical Philology at the University of Basel, where he taught until 1879 when poor health forced him to retire. He never recovered from a nervous breakdown in 1889 and died eleven years later. Known for saying that “god is dead,” Nietzsche propounded his metaphysical construct of the superiority of the disciplined individual (superman) living in the present over traditional values derived from Christianity and its emphasis on heavenly rewards. His ideas were appropriated by the Fascists, who turned his theories into social realities that he had never intended.
R. J. Hollingdale has translated eleven of Nietzsche’s books and published two books about him. He has also translated works by, among others, Schopenhauer, Goethe, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Lichtenberg and Theodor Fontane, many of these for the Penguin Classics. He is Honorary President of the British Nietzsche Society, and was for the Australian academic year 1991 Visiting Fellow at Trinity College, Melbourne.
R. J. Hollingdale has translated eleven of Nietzsche’s books and published two books about him. He has also translated works by, among others, Schopenhauer, Goethe, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Lichtenberg and Theodor Fontane, many of these for the Penguin Classics. He is Honorary President of the British Nietzsche Society, and was for the Australian academic year 1991 Visiting Fellow at Trinity College, Melbourne.

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