Reminiscences of Oxford (Google eBook)

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E.P. Dutton & Company, 1908 - 348 pages
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Page 202 - The which observed, a man may prophesy, With a near aim, of the main chance of things As yet not come to life ; which in their seeds, And weak beginnings lie intreasured. Such things become the hatch and brood of time...
Page 215 - Did he mean tardiness of locomotion? Goldsmith, who would say something without consideration, answered, ' Yes.' I was sitting by, and said, ' No, sir, you do not mean tardiness of locomotion ; you mean that sluggishness of mind which comes upon a man in solitude.
Page 142 - Campbell is a good man, a pious man. I am afraid he has not been in the inside of a church for many years * ; but he never passes a church without pulling off his hat. This shows that he has good principles.
Page 305 - twas muttered in hell, And echo caught faintly the sound as it fell ; On the confines of earth 'twas permitted to rest, And the depths of the ocean its presence confessed.
Page 322 - What is the question now placed before society with a glib assurance the most astounding ? The question is this Is man an ape or an angel ? My Lord, I am on the side of the angels.
Page 285 - And yet, steeped in sentiment as she lies, spreading her gardens to the moonlight, and whispering from her towers the last enchantments of the Middle Age, who will deny that Oxford, by her ineffable charm, keeps ever calling us nearer to the true goal of all of us, to the ideal, to perfection to beauty in a word, which is only truth seen from another side? nearer, perhaps, than all the science of Tubingen.
Page 70 - On that best portion of a good man's life, His little, nameless, unremembered acts Of kindness and of love.
Page 123 - When one would aim an arrow fair, But send it slackly from the string ; And one would pierce an outer ring, And one an inner, here and there ; And last the master-bowman, he Would cleave the mark.
Page 320 - So she went into the garden to cut a cabbage-leaf, to make an apple-pie; and at the same time a great she-bear, coming up the street, pops its head into the shop. 'What! no soap?
Page 306 - Twill not soften the heart ; but though deaf be the ear, It will make it acutely and instantly hear. Yet in shade let it rest, like a delicate flower, Ah ! breathe on it softly it dies in an hour.

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