Tears in the Graeco-Roman World

Front Cover
Thorsten Fgen
Walter de Gruyter, 2009 - Literary Criticism - 491 pages
0 Reviews
This volume presents a wide range of contributions that analyse the cultural, sociological and communicative significance of tears and crying in Graeco-Roman antiquity. The papers cover the time from the eighth century BCE until late antiquity and take into account a broad variety of literary genres such as epic, tragedy, historiography, elegy, philosophical texts, epigram and the novel. The collection also contains two papers from modern socio-psychology.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

An Introduction
1
Tears and Crying in Archaic Greek Poetry especially Homer
17
Grief Display and Concealment in Ancient Greek Culture
37
Tragic Tears and Gender
59
Dangerous Tears? Platonic Provocations and Aristotelic Answers
85
Dacryology from Herodotus to Polybius
105
Womens Tears in Ancient Roman Ritual
135
Tears in Lucretius
161
Tears as a Means of Communication in the Amphitheatre
253
Tears in Apuleius Metamorphoses
277
Weeping Statues Weeping Gods and Prodigies from Republican to EarlyChristian Rome
297
Observations on Weeping and Pleasure
311
Plutarchs Consolatio ad uxorem in Context
335
Crying and Salvation in Origen and Gregory of Nyssa
367
Sorrow Supplication and Sovereignty in Justinianic Constantinople
397
The Phenomenon of Crying from the Perspective of Social Neuroscience
419

Tears in Propertius Ovid and Greek Epistolographers
179
Tears in Roman Historiographers
209
Stoic and Epicurean Consolations in Senecas 99th Epistle
235
A Biopsychosocial Phenomenon
439
Backmatter
477
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Thorsten Fogen, Humboldt-Universitat zu Berlin, Germany.

Bibliographic information