Human Adaptability: An Introduction to Ecological Anthropology

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Emilio F. Moran
Westview Press, 2000 - Science - 446 pages
1 Review
This is the first text to thoroughly cover nongenetic strategies of human adaptation to a variety of ecosystems. Designed to help students understand the multiple levels at which human populations respond to their surroundings, it is the most complete discussion of environmental, physiological, behavioral, and cultural adaptive strategies available. Among the unique features that make Human Adaptability outstanding as both a textbook and a reference are a complete discussion of the development of ecological anthropology and of relevant research methods; the use of an ecosystem approach with emphasis on arctic, high altitude, arid land, grassland, and tropical rain forest environments; the most extensive bibliography on ecological anthropology published to date, with over 700 references both classic and recent; and a comprehensive glossary of technical terms. In this updated edition, the author also addresses the impact of political economy, global environment change, demography, and health in the study of human ecology.
  

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Contents

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Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xxiii - The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences at the University of Florida...
Page 58 - Odum defined the ecosystem as "any unit that includes all of the organisms (ie, the 'community') in a given area interacting with the physical environment so that a flow of energy leads to clearly defined trophic structure, biotic diversity, and material cycles (ie, exchange of materials between living and nonliving parts) within the system." The whole earth, he argued, is organized into an interlocking series of such "ecosystems...
Page xxii - Administrator shall, to the extent practicable, conduct such surveillance by utilizing the resources of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Geological Survey, and the Coast Guard, and shall report on such quality in the report required under subsection (a) of section 516...
Page 247 - These fellows from Ohio, Indiana, and other northern and western states the "bone and sinew of the country," as politicians call them have made farms, enclosed pastures, and fenced in water holes until you can't rest ; and I say, D n such bone and sinew!
Page 96 - Given the universality and constant properties of the circadian rhythms themselves, it seems reasonable to assume that the total amount of activity and inactivity is constant for the individual animal.
Page 247 - In those days [1874] there was no fencing along the trails to the North, and we had lots of range to graze on. Now there is so much land taken up and fenced in that the trail for most of the way is little better than a crooked lane, and we have hard unes to find enough range to feed on. These fellows from Ohio, Indiana, and other northern and western states the "bone and sinew of the country...
Page 42 - ... that on the one hand culture can be understood primarily only in terms of cultural factors, but that on the other hand no culture is wholly intelligible without reference to the noncultural or so-called environmental factors with which it is in relation and which condition it.
Page 128 - Instead, the Inuit carefully avoid percentage risks, even when the risk may be as low as 20 percent. Alertness is also valued. Seldom do they give their full attention to a single activity, but instead commonly glance around to survey their surroundings. Such alertness minimizes the danger of being carried away by floating ice, presents opportunities of hunting animals other than the one being stalked, and familiarizes each person with his surroundings.
Page 29 - Pliny, another Roman author, added to this assertion by describing Rome's location as so salutary to human development that "the manner of the people are gentle, the intellect clear, the genius fertile and capable of comprehending every part of nature. They have formed empires which has never been done by the remote nations" (Pliny quoted in Thomas 1925:38).

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About the author (2000)

Emilio F. Moran is James H. Rudy Professor of Anthropology; director of the Anthropological Center for Training and Research on Global Environmental Change; and co-director of the Center for the Study of Institutions, Population, and Environmental Change at Indiana University. Professor Moran was the first anthropologist to be awarded the Robert McC Netting Award (2002) by the Cultural Ecology Specialty Group of the Association of American Geographers. Emilio F. Moran is James H. Rudy Professor of Anthropology; director of the Anthropological Center for Training and Research on Global Environmental Change; and co-director of the Center for the Study of Institutions, Population, and Environmental Change at Indiana University. Professor Moran was the first anthropologist to be awarded the Robert McC Netting Award (2002) by the Cultural Ecology Specialty Group of the Association of American Geographers.

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