The Centrality of Agriculture: Between Humankind and the Rest of Nature

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, 1996 - Business & Economics - 286 pages
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Using ecological, historical, humanist, institutionalist, and Marxist methodologies, Duncan argues that the entire project of developing the theory of political economy has been seriously sidetracked by industrialism. Using England as a case study he shows that the relationship between modernity and agriculture need not be uncomfortable and suggests ways in which the original socialist project can be rejuvenated to make it both more feasible and more attractive. Duncan concludes that no sustainable human future can be conceived unless and until the centrality of agriculture is properly recognized and new economic institutions are developed that will encourage people to take care of their landscapes.
  

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Contents

Preindustrial Environmental History
18
Practical and FutureOriented
39
Agriculture in the English Case
53
Land Stewardship in a Modern but Preindustrial Society
69
CONTEMPORARY AGRICULTURE DISPLACED
90
The Agrarian Situation in Europe
103
Mechanization and Chemicalization Distinguished
116
Eduard David on Socialism and Agriculture
130
Types of Relations among Persons Nature and Use
141
The Need to Protect Sound Local Practices
157
A New Money for a New Social Form
170
Notes
185
References
229
Index
269
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