The Blockade Runners

Front Cover
Kessinger Publishing, Jun 1, 2004 - Fiction - 64 pages
11 Reviews
The Blockade Runners and Dr. Ox's Experiment In "The Blockade Runners" Verne again adopts a theme which is, at least nominally, American. In it he gives a very fair view of the British attitude toward our country during that tragic period of our suffering and trial. "Dr. Ox's Experiment" was one of those prophetic scientific fantasies which leaped so frequently into the inspired mind of Verne. The remarkably vivifying and invigorating effects of pure oxygen, even upon the dying, have now become an established part of medical science. In 1874, when "Doctor Ox" was published, the knowledge of this gas was in its infancy. Verne tells us that the story was suggested by an actual experience of his own in Paris, in which he realized the effects "trs interessante" of the potent gas. The story develops a spirit of mischievous exaggeration and burlesque very different from the author's usually serious and thoughtful attitude toward scientific marvels.

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Review: The Blockade Runners (Extraordinary Voyages #8*)

User Review  - Mary - Goodreads

A lovely little story. Packs plenty of adventure into a very short story (for Jules Verne, anyway!) Also a very sweet love story, which is always skillfully done by Verne. Great for new or young Verne ... Read full review

Review: The Blockade Runners (Extraordinary Voyages #8*)

User Review  - Byron 'Giggsy' Paul - Goodreads

I found this quite enjoyable, following the adventure of a ship's captain whose mission changes in response to a pair of non-sailors that found their way on board. It's a love story too, but doesn't ... Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Jules Verne, one of the most influential writers of modern times, was born on February 8, 1828 in Nantes, France. He wrote for the theater and worked briefly as a stockbroker. Verne is considered by many to be the father of science fiction. His most popular novels include Journey to the Center of the Earth, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, and Around the World in Eighty Days. These and others have been made into movies and TV mini-series. Twenty Thousand Leagues is even the basis of a popular ride at the Disney theme parks. In 1892, he was made a Chevalier of the Legion of Honor in France. He died on March 24, 1905 in Amiens, France.

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