Nil: A Land Beyond Belief

Front Cover
SLG Pub., 2005 - Comics & Graphic Novels - 232 pages
11 Reviews
Join fellow sufferer Proun Nul on his quest to find meaning in a desolate world saturated with angst and ennui. Foreman on a deconstruction ship that specializes in demolishing belief outbreaks, Nul is prodded out of his complacency by a false murder charge, and sets off on a journey that takes him to the very brink of hope. A 232-page concoction of fiction and intrigue that delves into the bleak and bitter philosophical brew of Nihilist chic.

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Review: Nil: A Land Beyond Belief

User Review  - Kit - Goodreads

Dear lord this book though. Beautiful illustrations, brilliant writing. Kinda like 1984 in comic form. Read full review

Review: Nil: A Land Beyond Belief

User Review  - Trevor - Goodreads

Such detailed illustrations and such a broadly bleak world. . . great dark humor. If you like nihilism humor, you'll love this book! Read full review

Contents

Section 1
4
Section 2
8
Section 3
13
Copyright

10 other sections not shown

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About the author (2005)

James Turner started making comics as soon as he was first able to hold a pencil, and has been spouting a nonsensical whirlwind of monsters, robots and talking vegetables ever since. His acclaimed web comic The Unfeasible Adventures of Beaver and Steve won tens of thousands of followers online, and his anthropomorphic crime fighting team "The Super Animal Adventure Squad" appeared weekly in the pages of the children's comic the DFC. He has sworn that he will not stop making comics until every bizarre character, every unfeasible adventure, and every terrible pun has been uncovered. But he might stop for a bit if someone offers him a biscuit.

Jorge Monlongo's natural habitat is Madrid, Spain. He eats all sorts of things and likes to sleep late. He can sometimes be seen drawing comic books, illustrating books or painting, but usually it just likes hanging out and being lazy.

Gemma Correll is a freelance illustrator, coffee drinker, and sometime ukelele player, based in deepest, darkest England. She has exhibited her work in galleries and shop windows around the world and her artwork has been reproduced on everything from placemats to t-shirts to umbrellas. She has also had her work published in various books, annuals and magazines. Gemma dreams of one day owning a house somewhere warm, with a mezzanine, pretty curtains and space for several small squishy-faced dogs and a few fluffy kitties.

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