Vanished Arizona: Recollections of My Army Life (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Jan 1, 2010 - History - 374 pages
8 Reviews
Martha Summerhayes was a respectable Victorian lady when she left civilized society behind, in 1874, to follow her cavalry-officer husband West, to the Wyoming Territory and then to unknown and inaccessible Arizona. Written "at the urgent and ceaseless request" of her children and first published in 1908, this compulsively readable account of her life on the frontier is a unique document of the American exploration and settling of the West, offering a little-heard woman's perspective on an historical era that continues to echo in contemporary American society. From the deprivations of her kitchen-where she has no choice but to make do with army pots and pans designed for cooking for dozens-to terrifying encounters with wildlife, attacks by Indians, and the challenge of giving birth alone, Summerhayes' indomitable spirit and sense of adventure shines through.
  

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Review: Vanished Arizona: Recollections of the Army Life of a New England Woman

User Review  - Carol - Goodreads

I loved the stories of early Arizona, though I don't care for the author; too much complaining! Read full review

Review: Vanished Arizona: Recollections of the Army Life of a New England Woman

User Review  - Shawna Fox - Goodreads

I thought this book was a great story and full of historical information. Although I did find it a little mundane in some parts, overall it was very informative. I think it is a great read for anyone interested in history/military history. Read full review

Contents

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IX
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Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Martha Summerhayes (1844-1911), was a Nantucket, Massachusetts native who later on in life immigrated to Arizona. A well travelled and educated woman, Summerhayes spent two years, from 1871 to 1873, studying literature in Germany. Her passion for writing took her into a career as a writer. She became well known as a writer in Massachusetts, but she usually did her writing during the winter, which, in turn, led to her becoming interested in the warmer weather of Arizona. In 1873, she married soldier John Wyer Summerhayes, a veteran of the American Civil War. Wyer Summerhayes was still in the military when the couple married, so Martha further expanded her travels by going with her husband wherever the military sent him when no war was being fought. The Summerhayes arrived at Fort Russell, near Cheyenne, Wyoming shortly after marrying. In 1874, they were sent by the military to an Arizona that at the time counted with only about 20,000 habitants. They stayed at a ranch owned by Corydon Cooley, a White man who had two Indian wives. Accommodations at Cooley's ranch were quite different from what Martha Summerhayes had experience in the east and Europe. She also disturbed by the fact that Cooley had two wives. Her observations were published in 1908 in an autobiography named "Vanished Arizona" that details her memories of Arizona and the West before widespread settlement and the experiences of military wives.

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