Diary of a Journey Across Tibet (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1894 - Tibet (China) - 309 pages
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Page 213 - Chang -like country, which could be seen stretching away to the north and east as far as the eye could reach, while in the foreground several herds of goa were grazing.
Page 82 - ... uttering cries, gave a feeling of life and animation contrasting strongly with the death-like solitude hanging over the salt lakes. It is almost impossible to get the correct names of places or lakes in Tibet, as every Tibetan lies on every occasion on which he does not see a good valid reason for telling the truth. Sometimes I have asked half a dozen men separately the name of a lake and received half a dozen different answers.
Page 311 - Faith Eleven Sermons, with a Preface. By the REV. HC BEECHING, MA, Rector of Yattendon, Berks. CONTENTS.— The Object of Faith— The Worship of Faith— The Righteousness of Faith— The Food of Faith— National Faith— The Eye of Faith— The Ear...
Page 100 - If one offers a man tea, ho generally refuses it, unless someone first drinks a portion in his presence ; and when offering anything to eat or drink a Tibetan invariably ostentatiously takes some in order to show there is nothing to be afraid of. We were also asked if gold, pearls, and rubies found a place in the European pharmacopoeia, and much surprise was expressed when Dr. Thorold assured them that they had no medicinal value. The Talai Lama is regularly dosed with medicines composed of those...
Page 281 - ... to Lhasa, where there are a few Chinese stationed at each of the rest-houses ; but the children seem to grow up thoroughly Tibetan ; and...
Page 86 - Europeans had not been as quickly reported as it should have been, and he wanted to punish the delinquents ; but, as we were dressed in Ladakh raiment, and the people always prefer to look at strangers from afar off, our not being spotted as Europeans was hardly to be wondered at. Next day, when we were starting off to pay a return visit to our friends, a messenger came over from their camp, asking us to postpone it, as they were very busy owing to important news having arrived. We were naturally...
Page 100 - ... refuses it, unless someone first drinks a portion in his presence ; and when offering anything to eat or drink a Tibetan invariably ostentatiously takes some in order to show there is nothing to be afraid of. We were also asked if gold, pearls, and rubies found a place in the European pharmacopoeia, and much surprise was expressed when Dr. Thorold assured them that they had no medicinal value. The Talai Lama is regularly dosed with medicines composed of those ingredients, so there is little to...
Page 281 - ... up by a waist-belt during the day so that the upper part is very full, and the lower part hangs down like a kilt. At night they take off the belt and allow the robe to come down to their feet; it thus serves the double purpose of clothes by day and bedding by night. In warm weather, or what they consider warm weather, the right arm is bare, being thrust out of the coat ; in the front of the waist-belt thrust across the body, a straight sword, in a scabbard ornamented with silver and inlaid with...
Page 94 - The answer to this was, that Tibet was forbidden ground to all strangers ; that the only thing they would permit us to do was to return the way we had come at once; and as for the friendship existing between the two Governments, that was no reason why the people of both nations should not stick to their own countries.
Page 100 - ... but were all a trifle long in the tooth. However, " never look a gift horse in the mouth," and if they lasted for three months that was all we wanted. The Kushok rather astonished me one day by expressing admiration of our beards, and asking if we had any medicine that would make his grow. As anything like a decent beard is almost unknown in Tibet, I should have thought a hairless face would have been more admired. The Lama was very anxious to know if we had any English poisons. Poisoning is...

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