War and Peace

Front Cover
Wordsworth Editions, Jan 1, 1993 - Fiction - 994 pages
136 Reviews
In Russia's struggle with Napoleon, Tolstoy saw a tragedy that involved all mankind. Yet while his historical vision ranged beyond national frontiers, his imaginative vision focused, with extraordinary intensity, on the lives of individuals, on the physical reality of human experience and its bewildering complexity. Greater than a historical chronicle, War and Peace is an affirmation of life itself, 'a complete picture', as a contemporary reviewer put it, 'of everything in which people find their happiness and greatness, their grief and humiliation'.
  

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The typeface is easy to read and by no means small. - LibraryThing
For such an immense novel, the pacing is wonderful. - LibraryThing
Even so, I love Tolstoy the writer. - LibraryThing
Read it and form your own judgment. - LibraryThing
Turgenieff to me is the greatest writer there ever was. - LibraryThing
But he was an amateur writer. - LibraryThing

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - steadfastreader - LibraryThing

I enjoyed this book. It's not as good as Anna Karenina, but it's still worth the read. I'll admit that I was bored by the war part. The development of the characters is amazing but the lengthy ... Read full review

Review: Great Books of the Western World

User Review  - Garrett Starr - Goodreads

I have always wanted this collection, but over the years I purchased other books instead. When our church moved into our current digs, this entire collection was hidden away in a back room and covered ... Read full review

Contents

BOOK
3
Pierre at Anatole Kurdgins Dolokhovs het
23
Julie Kardgina
67
Prince Andrew leaves to join the army Princess Mary gives him an icon
79
BOOK
85
1819 Batde scenes Quarrelsome commanders Nicholas injured
140
Panic Timokhins counterattack Dolokhovs insistence Tushins hattery Prince Andrew sent to order him to retreat
145
Withdrawal of the forces Nicholas rides on a gun carriage Tushin called to account hy Bagration Prince Andrew defends him Depression of Nicholas
149
1718 Nicholas visits him in hospital
314
Boris at Tilsit Nicholass inopportune visit
318
He tries to present Denisovs petition at the Emperors residence hutfails
320
Napoleon and Alexander as allies Perplexity of Nicholas Another hotde
323
Reallife
326
VOLUME
327
BOOK SIX 13 Prince Andrews occupations at Boguchdrovo His drive through the forest The hare oak His visit to the Rostovs at Otrddnoe Overhears...
329
46 Sperdnski Arakcheev and Prince Andrew
333

BOOK THREE 12 Prince Vasili and Pierre A soiree at Anna Pavlovnas Helenes nameday Pierres marriage
155
Prince Vasili andAnatole visit Prince Bolkonski Princess Marys appearance
165
Lise Mademoiselle Bourienne Mary Anatole and ald Bolkonski
170
Her fathers opposition to Marys marrying She fmds Mademoiselle Bourienne andAnatole in the conservatory Declines marriage
175
A letter from Nicholas Sonya and Natasha
178
Nicholas visits Boris and Berg in camp Nicholas tells ofSchon Grahern His encounter with Prince Andrew
182
The Emperors review of the army Enthusiasm of Nicholas
187
Boris visits Prince Andrew at Olmiitz Prince Dolgorukov
190
Nicholas not in the action at Wischau The Emperor Nicholass devotion to him
194
Preparations for action Dolgoriikovs opinion of Napoleon and of his position Kutuzov s depression
198
The Council of War Weyrothers plans Kutuzov sleeps Prince Andrews reflections
201
Rostov at the front Visit of Bagration and Dolgorukov Rostov sent to reconnoitre Napoleons proclamation
205
1419 Batde ofAusterlitz Prince Andrew hadly wounded
208
BOOK FOUR 1 Nicholas home on leave
229
Preparations for Cluh dinner
234
The dinner Bagration as guest of honour
237
Pierre challenges Dolokhov
241
The duel
244
Pierres separation from Helene
245
Andrew considered dead
248
Lises confinement Andrew arrives
250
Death of Lise
253
o Denisov and Dolokhov at the Rostovs 2 54
257
logels hall Denisovs mazurka
258
1314 Nicholas loses 000 ruhles to Dolokhov
260
Nicholas at home Natasha sings
264
Nicholas tells his father of his losses Denisov proposes to Natasha
267
BOOK FIVE 12 Pierre meets Bazdeev
271
34 Pierre hecomes a freemason
276
Pierre repulses Prince Vasfli
283
A soiree at Anna Pavlovnas Helene takes up Boris
284
Hippolyte at Anna Pavlovnas
287
Old Bolkonski as commanderinchief of the conscription Andrews anxiety A letter from his father
288
Bilihins letter ahout the campaign The hahy convalescent
291
Pierre goes to Kiev and visits his estates Ohstacles to the emancipation of his serfs
294
He visits Prince Andrew
297
Their talk on the ferry raft
302
Gods folk at Bald Hills
304
Old Bolkonski and Pierre
307
Nicholas rejoins his regiment Shortage of provisions
308
Denisov seizes transports of food gets into trouhle is wounded
311
78 Pierre and the Petershurg Freemasons He visits Joseph Alexeevich Reconciliation with Helene
341
Helene V social success Her salon and relations with Boris
345
Pierres diary
347
The Rostovs in Petershurg Berg engaged to Vera and demands her dowry
350
Natasha and Boris
352
Natashas hedtime talks with her mother
354
1417 Natashas first grand hall She danceswith Prince Andrew
356
Bitski calls on Prince Andrew Dinner at Sperdnskis Prince Andrews disillusionment with him and his reforms
364
Prince Andrew calls on the Rostovs Natashas effect on him
367
2021 The Bergsevening party
368
Natasha consults her mother Prince Andrew confides in Pierre
372
Natashas distress at Prince Andrews ahsence He returns and they hecome engaged
374
Prince Andrews last days with Natasha
378
Prince Bolkonskis treatment of Mary Her letter to Julie Kardgina
380
Prince Bolkonski threatens to marry Mademoiselle Bourienne
382
BOOK SEVEN 1 Nicholas Rostov returns home on leave His douhts ahout Natashas engagement
385
Nicholas setdes accounts with Mitenka
387
Nicholas decides to go hunting
389
The wolfhunt hegins
390
The wolf is taken
394
The foxhunt and huntsmens quarrel Ilagin V courtesy Chasing a hare Rugdys triumph
397
An evening at Uncles The halalayka Natashas Russian dance
401
His mother urges Nicholas to marry Julie Kardgina and grumhles at Sonya
406
Christmas at Otrddnoe Natasha is depressed and capricious
408
Nicholas Natasha and Sonya indulge in recollections Dimmler plays and Natasha sings The maskers A troyka drive to the Melyukovs
411
At Melyukovka Sonya goes to the harn to try her fortune
416
The drive home Natasha and Sonya try the future with lookingglasses
419
His mother opposes Nicholass wish to marry Sonya and he returns to his regiment Natasha hecomes resdess and impatient for Prince Andrew V return
421
What for?andWhy?
423
Prince Bolkonski in Moscow His harsh treatment of Princess Mary She teaches litde Nicholas The old Prince and Mademoiselle Bourienne
426
Dr Metivier treated as a spy hy the old Prince The dinner on the Princes nameday
428
Pierre and Princess Mary discuss Boris and Natasha
432
Boris and Julie Their melancholy Boris proposes and is accepted
433
Count Ilya Rostov Natasha and Sonya stay with Mdrya Dmitrievna in Moscow
436
Count Rostov and Natasha call on Prince Bolkonski They are received hy Princess Mary Prince Bolkonskis strange hehaviour Mary and Natasha disli...
438
The Rostovs at the Opera Helene in the next hox
440
The opera descrihed Anatole and Pierre arrive Natasha makes Helenes acquaintance Duport dances
443
Helene presents Anatole to Natasha He courts her
446
Anatole and Dolokhov in Moscow
448
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Elliot Aronson
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About the author (1993)

Nikolai Tolstoy is a highly recognized and acclaimed historian and biographer. He was the sole beneficiary of his stepfather's will and is one of the trustees of O'Brian's estate.

Tolstoy's life was defined by moral and artistic seeking and by conflict with himself and his surroundings. Of the old nobility, he began by living the usual, dissipated life of a man of his class; however, his inner compulsion for moral self-justification led him in a different direction. In 1851 he became a soldier in the Caucasus and began to publish even while stationed there (Childhood [1852] and other works). Even more significant were his experiences during the Crimean War: the siege of Sevastopol provided the background for his sketches of human behavior in battle in the Sevastopol Stories (1855--56). After the war, Tolstoy mixed for a time with St. Petersburg literary society, traveled extensively abroad, and married Sophia Bers. The couple were happy for a long time, with Countess Tolstoy participating actively in her husband's literary and other endeavors. The center of Tolstoy's life became family, which he celebrated in the final section of War and Peace (1869). In this great novel, he unfolded the stories of several families in Russia during the Napoleonic period and explored the nature of historical causation and of freedom and necessity. A different note emerged in Anna Karenina (1876). Here, too, Tolstoy focused on families but this time emphasized an individual's conflict with society's norms. A period of inner crisis, depression, and thoughts of suicide culminated in Tolstoy's 1879 conversion to a rationalistic form of Christianity in which moral behavior was supremely important. Confession (1882) describes this profound transition. Tolstoy now began to proselytize his new-found faith through fiction, essays, and personal contacts. Between 1880 and 1883, he wrote three major works on religion. A supreme polemicist, he participated in debates on a large number of political and social issues, generally at odds with the government. His advocacy of nonresistance to evil attracted many followers and later had a profound influence on Mahatma Gandhi and, through him, Martin Luther King, Jr. (see Vol. 4). Tolstoy's stature as a writer and public figure was enormous both within Russia and abroad, greater than that of any other Russian writer. When the Orthodox Church excommunicated him in 1901, a cartoon depicted him as disproportionately larger than his ecclesiastical judges. Tolstoy's final years were filled with inner torment: Living as he did on a luxurious estate, he felt himself to be a betrayer of his own teachings. He also suffered from disputes with his wife over the disposition of his property, which she wished to safeguard for their children. In 1910, desperately unhappy, the aged writer left his home at Yasnaya Polyana. He did not get far; he caught pneumonia and died of heart failure at a railway station, an event that was headline news throughout the world. In the course of Tolstoy's career, his art evolved significantly, but it possessed a certain underlying unity. From the beginning, he concentrated on the inner life of human beings, though the manner of his analysis changed. The body of his writing is enormous, encompassing both fiction and a vast amount of theoretical and polemical material. Besides his three great novels---War and Peace, Anna Karenina, and Resurrection (1899)---he wrote many superb shorter works. Among these, The Death of Ivan Ilyich (1886) stands out as a literary masterpiece and fine philosophical text, while the short novel Hadji Murat (1904), set in the Caucasus and Russia during the reign of Nicholas I, is a gem of narration and plot construction. Tolstoy has been translated extensively. The Louise and Aylmer Maude and Constance Garnett translations are institutions (for many works, the only versions available) and are used by different publishers, sometimes in modernized versions. New translations by Rosemary Edmonds, David Magarshack, and Ann Dunigan are also justifiably popular.

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