Architectural Principles in the Age of Humanism

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, 1971 - Architecture - 173 pages
2 Reviews
Sir Kenneth Clark wrote in the Architectural Review, that the first result of this book was to dispose, once and for all, of the hedonist, or purely aesthetic, theory of Renaissance architecture, and this defines Wittkower s intention in a nutshell."
  

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Review: Architectural Principles in the Age of Humanism

User Review  - Matthew Festger - Goodreads

A good read through concerning what architects of the time believed should generate space. The book explains both the theory itself and its origins, and then investigates the manner in which those ... Read full review

Review: Architectural Principles in the Age of Humanism

User Review  - Michael - Goodreads

A bit dated in terms of historiography, but this book still retains its explanatory power. Read full review

Contents

Albertis Programme of the Ideal Church
3
Centralized Churches in Later Architectural Theory
13
S Maria delle Carceri
19
The Religious Symbolism of Centrally Planned
27
ALBERTIS APPROACH TO ANTIQUITY
34
PRINCIPLES OF PALLADIOS ARCHITECTURE
57
THE PROBLEM OF HARMONIC PROPORTION
101
Francesco Giorgis Memorandum for S Francesco
155
Bibliographical Notes on the Theory of Proportion
162
Copyright

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References to this book

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About the author (1971)

Rudolf Wittkower was born in Berlin in 1901. Leaving Germany when the Nazis came to power, he was one of the animators of the Warburg Institute of London. In 1941 he organized, with Fritz Saxl, the exhibition British Art and the Mediterranean, the publication of which (1948) forms an important document of the aims and methods of the Warburg Institute. A great scholar of Italian Renaissance and Baroque art, Wittkower taught at both the University of London and Columbia University. His books, all important works of scholarship, include Die Zeichnungen des Gian Lorenzo Bernini (with H. Bruer, 1931), The Drawings of the Carracci at Windsor Castle (1952), Gian Lorenzo Bernini, the Sculptor of Roman Baroque (1955), Art and Architecture in Italy, 1600-1750 (1958), Born under Saturn (with Margot Wittkower, 1963), and Divine Michelangelo: The Florentine Academy's Homage on His Death in 1564 (with Margot Wittkower, 1964). In addition, he was a frequent contributor to the Journal of the Warbung and Courtauld Institute, the Art Bulletin, Burlington Magazine and the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, among others.

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