Korea style

Front Cover
Tuttle Publishing, 2006 - Architecture - 224 pages
2 Reviews
Korea Style reveals the intrinsic elements of Korean design; simplicity, moderation, constraint, and a deep respect for all things natural. Despite the filtering of Japanese and Western design ideas into Korea over the millennia, the peninsula has maintained its own identity and is gaining recognition for its own particular "style". Spatial, spiritual and material qualities are reflected in the simple beauty of its architectural design, while classic objects that immediately distinguish themselves as being uniquely Korean are used with distinctive flair in interior decoration.

Korea Style is the first book devoted to the country's architecture and interior design-featuring twenty-two exceptional homes, studios and public and heritage buildings. Ranging from vernacular to cutting-edge creations, all are a celebration of the country's natural landscape, arts and crafts and architectural heritage juxtaposed with a drive towards invention, experimentation and individuality.

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Great Book!

User Review  - 123lalala - Overstock.com

This book is great. There are lots of information on Korean style of architecture and landscape design. Also, the design of the book is great and the photography is beautiful. Read full review

Review: Korea Style

User Review  - Maria - Goodreads

I love looking at design books. So pretty, so ideal and so far from the regular, ordinary housing. Read full review

Contents

Korean Aesthetics Modern Directions
8
Metropolitan Sanctuary
18
Lock Museum and Residence
29
Copyright

23 other sections not shown

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About the author (2006)

Marcia Iwatate is one of the leading professionals in the Japanese design and food industry. She is the author of Eat.Work.Shop., and the co-author of Japan Houses and Shunju: New Japanese Cuisine, which won a James Beard Award in 2004.

Kim Unsoo was born in Korea and educated in the United States. She has worked in the contemporary art field in both New York and Seoul. She lives in Seoul with her husband and two children.

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