Labor'S War At Home: The Cio In World War Ii (Google eBook)

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Northwestern University Press, Jun 25, 2010 - History - 344 pages
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Labor's War at Home examines a critical period in American politics and labor history, beginning with the outbreak of war in Europe in 1939 through the wave of major industrial strikes that followed the war and accompanied the reconversion to a peacetime economy. Nelson Lichtenstein is concerned both with the internal organizations and social dynamics of the labor movement—especially the Congress of Industrial Organizations—and with the relationship between the CIO, as well as other bodies of organized labor, and the Roosevelt administration. He argues that tensions within the labor movement and within the ranks of American business profoundly affected government policy during the war and the nature of organized labor's political relations with Roosevelt and the Democratic Party. Moreover, the political arrangements worked out during the war established the foundations of social stability and labor politics that came to characterize the postwar world.
  

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Contents

2 The Unfinished Struggle
8
3 CIO politics on the eve of war
26
4 Responsible unionism
44
5 Union security and the Little Steel formula
67
6 Equality of sacrifice
82
7 The social ecology of shopfloor conflict
110
8 Incentive pay politics
136
9 Holding the line
157
10 The bureaucratic imperative
178
11 Reconversion politics
203
Labor in postwar America
233
Notes
246
Bibliographical essay
301
Index
309
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Page 30 - It ill behooves one who has supped at labor's table and who has been sheltered in labor's house to curse with equal fervor and fine impartiality both labor and its adversaries when they become locked in deadly embrace.

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About the author (2010)

Nelson Lichtenstein is Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of numerous books, including Walter Reuther: The Most Dangerous Man in Detroit and, most recently, State of the Union: A Century of American Labor.

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