Racing through paradise: a Pacific passage

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Random House, May 12, 1987 - Sports & Recreation - 344 pages
5 Reviews
Chronicles the author's four-thousand-mile sailing voyage across the Pacific ocean with four close friends, his son, Christopher, and a photographer

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Review: Racing Through Paradise: A Pacific Passage

User Review  - Laird Bennion - Goodreads

I was surprised how much I like this - it's just a buddy-adventure account with WFB's slightly odd crew. Not a polished adventure - more like a moderately-dressed-up travelogue. Not all of us can take months off to sail the world - this book let me do it on my morning bus commute. Read full review

Review: Racing Through Paradise: A Pacific Passage

User Review  - Maija Urrelo - Goodreads

I want a boat now. Damn it. Read full review

Contents

PATITO
15
THE ANGEL OF CRAIGS POINT
36
IN AROUND LONG ISLAND SOUND
46
Copyright

17 other sections not shown

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About the author (1987)

Editor and writer William F. Buckley, Jr. was born in New York City on November 24, 1925. While at Yale University, he studied political science, history and economics and graduated with honors. In 1955, he founded the weekly journal National Review where he was editor in chief. He began his syndicated newspaper column in 1962 and his weekly television discussion program, Firing Line was syndicated in 1966. Buckley wrote "God and Man at Yale" (1951) which was an indictment of liberal education in the United States, "Up from Liberalism" (1959), "The Unmaking of a Mayor" (1966), which tells of his unsuccessful mayoral campaign as the Conservative Party candidate for New York City in 1965, and "Quotations from Chairman Bill" (1970). Buckley also wrote best selling stories of international intrigue whose titles include "Saving the Queen" (1976), "Stained Glass" (1978), "Who's on First" (1980), "Marco Polo, If You Can" (1981), and "See You Later, Alligator" (1985). He died on February 27, 2008.

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