A last and summary answer to the question 'Of what use ... are the English cathedral establishments?' In a letter to lord Henley [on his Plan of Church reform]. (Google eBook)

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1833
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Page 51 - HARRY, whose tuneful and well-measured song First taught our English music how to span Words with just note and accent, not to scan With Midas' ears, committing short and long, Thy worth and skill exempts thee from the throng, With praise enough for Envy to look wan : To after age thou shalt be writ the man That with smooth air couldst humour best our tongue.
Page 107 - He has read all our poets, with particular attention to this delicacy of versification, and wonders at the...
Page 51 - Midas' ears, committing short and long, Thy worth and skill exempts thee from the throng, With praise enough for Envy to look wan : To after age thou shalt be writ the man That with smooth air couldst humour best our tongue. Thou honour'st verse, and verse must lend her wing To honour thee, the priest of Phoebus' quire, That tun'st their happiest lines in hymn or story.
Page 52 - I WAS glad when they said unto me, We will go into the house of the Lord.
Page 78 - Through frost and snow, in sunshine and in rain, Duly as tolls the bell, to the high fane Explores, with faltering footsteps, his dark way, To kneel before his Maker, and to hear The solemn service chanted full and clear.
Page 78 - Explores, with faltering footsteps, his dark way, To kneel before his Maker, and to hear The solemn service chanted full and clear. Ask why, alone, in the same spot he kneels Through the long year ? Oh, the wide world is cold And dark to him, but here no more he feels His sad bereavement : Faith and Hope uphold His heart ; amid the tumult of Mankind He droops no longer: lone, and poor, and blind, His soul is in the choirs aljove the skies, And songs, far off, of angel harmonies.
Page 45 - Or th' unseen genius of the wood. But let my due feet never fail , To walk the studious cloister's pale, And love the high embowed roof, With antique pillars massy proof, And storied windows, richly dight, Casting a dim religious light. There let the pealing organ blow To the full-voic'd quire below, In service high, and anthems clear, As may with sweetness, through mine ear Dissolve me into ecstasies, And bring all heaven before mine eyes.
Page 55 - And in remembrance of Sion, The tears for grief burst out ; We hanged our harps and instruments The willow-trees upon; For in that place men for their use Had planted many a one.
Page 79 - Oh ! happy if the vain, the rich, the proud The pageant actors of life's motley crowd Would drop the mask; the moral prospect scan, And learn one lesson from a poor blind man ! LORD NELSON.
Page 108 - With the same triumphant success the great Arminius is produced, to prove what? that the greater Calvin was not a most ruthless Persecutor? no such thing! that Arminius called him "an INCOMPARABLE INTERPRETER of scripture !" This, at least, is not Oxford logic ! " But I am no Theologian !" Oh ! if by Theology is meant the Dogmas of that great Theologian, or any part of the spirit of that " incomparable interpreter of scripture...

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