A HISTORY OF MASSACHUSETTS IN THE CIVIL WAR (Google eBook)

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Page 76 - Flag of the free heart's hope and home, By angel hands to valor given ! Thy stars have lit the welkin dome, And all thy hues were born in heaven. Forever float that standard sheet ! Where breathes the foe but falls before us, With Freedom's soil beneath our feet, And Freedom's banner streaming o'er us ? JOSEPH RODMAN DRAKE.
Page 337 - We join ourselves to no party that does not carry the flag and keep step to the music of the Union.
Page 116 - May it ever wave in honor, in unsullied glory, and patriotic hope, on the dome of the capitol, on the country's stronghold, on the...
Page 525 - They never fail who die In a great cause : the block may soak their gore ; Their heads may sodden in the sun ; their limbs Be strung to city gates and castle walls But still their spirit walks abroad. Though years Elapse, and others share as dark a doom, They but augment the deep and sweeping thoughts Which overpower all others, and conduct The world at last to freedom.
Page 668 - Thro gain and loss thro' glory and disgrace Along the plains, where passionate Discord rears Eternal Babel still the holy stream Of human happiness glides on! Louis. And must we Thank for that also our prime minister?
Page 221 - Before receiving into service any number of volunteers exceeding those now called for and accepted, the President shall, from time to time, issue his proclamation, stating the number desired, either as cavalry, infantry or artillery, and the States from which they are to be furnished, having reference, in any such requisition, to the number then in...
Page 443 - Part of his force advanced to within two miles of Richmond, and the enemy's communications have been cut in every direction. " The army of the Potomac will speedily resume offensive operations.
Page 156 - The mode in which such outbreaks are to be considered, should depend entirely upon the loyalty or disloyalty of the community in which they occur, and in the vicinity of Annapolis, I can, on this occasion, perceive no reason of military policy, why a force summoned to the...
Page 22 - ... would have been that, as between the Union and the State, ultimate allegiance was due to the State. A recurrence to the elementary principles of human nature tells us that this would have been so, and could have been no otherwise. We have all heard of a famous, much-quoted remark of Mr. Gladstone to the effect that the Constitution of the United States was " the most wonderful work ever struck off at a given time by the brain and purpose of man.
Page 524 - But the heart swells with unwonted emotion when we remember our sons and brothers, whose constant valor has sustained on the field, during nearly three years of war, the cause of our country, of civilization and liberty. Our volunteers have represented MassachuELOQUENT EXTRACT.

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