The Battle of Hampton Roads: New Perspectives on the USS Monitor and CSS Virginia (Google eBook)

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Harold Holzer, Tim Mulligan
Fordham Univ Press, 2006 - History - 222 pages
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On March 8 and 9, 1862, a sea battle off the Virginia coast changed naval warfare forever. It began when the Confederate States Navy's CSS Virginia led a task force to break the Union blockade of Hampton Roads. The Virginia sank the USS Cumberland and forced the frigate Congress to surrender. Damaged by shore batteries, the Virginia retreated, returning the next day to find her way blocked by the newly arrived USS Monitor. The clash of ironclads was underway. After fighting for nine hours, both ships withdrew, neither seriously damaged, with both sides claiming victory. Although the battle may have been a draw and the Monitor sank in a storm later that year, this first encounter between powered, ironclad warships spelled the end of wooden warships-and the dawn of a new navy. This book takes a new look at this historic battle. The ten original essays, written by leading historians, explore every aspect of the battle-from the building of the warships and life aboard these iron coffinsto tactics, strategy, and the debates about who really won the battle of Hampton Roads. Co-published with The Mariners' Museum, home to the USS Monitor Center, this authoritative guide to the military, political, technological, and cultural dimensions of this historic battle also features a portfolio of classic lithographs, drawings, and paintings. Harold Holzer is one of the country's leading experts on the Civil War. His books include Lincoln and Cooper Union: The Speech That Made Abraham Lincoln President and, for Fordham, Lincoln on Democracy (co-edited with Mario M. Cuomo) and The Lincoln-Douglas Debates: The Complete, Unexpurgated Text. Tim Mulligan's books include Virginia: A History and Guide.
  

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User Review  - Shrike58 - LibraryThing

A fairly readable collection of essays which at their best draw heavily on contemporary accounts of how these ships were received, how they fought, and what it was like to serve in them. The single ... Read full review

Contents

IV
1
V
19
VI
37
VII
57
VIII
85
IX
111
X
125
XI
141
XII
155
XIII
171
XIV
189
XV
193
XVI
211
XVII
215
Copyright

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Page xiv - It could not be called a vessel at all; it was a machine, and I have seen one of somewhat similar appearance employed in cleaning out the docks; or, for lack of a better similitude, it looked like a gigantic rat-trap. It was ugly, questionable, suspicious, evidently mischievous; nay, I will allow myself to call it devilish...

About the author (2006)

Harold Holzer, Senior Vice President for External Affairs at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, is one of the nation's leading authorities on Lincoln and the political culture of the Civil War era. His books include Lincoln and Cooper Union: The Speech That Made Abraham Lincoln President and, forFordham, Lincoln on Democracy (co-edited with Mario M. Cuomo) and The Lincoln-Douglas Debates: The Complete, Unexpurgated Text. Tim Mulligan's books include Virginia: A History and Guide.

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