Tropical night falling

Front Cover
Simon & Schuster, 1991 - Fiction - 189 pages
5 Reviews
From one of Latin America's most celebrated writers--author of Kiss of the Spider Woman--comes his poignant yet hard-edged final novel. At the heart of the story are two elderly Argentine sisters who share a life of gentle gossip. But through their conversations, Puig reveals the chaotic, violent lives of their neighbors.

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Review: Tropical Night Falling

User Review  - David - Goodreads

Brutally charming story of two elderly sisters from Argentina that live in Rio and love to gossip. And talk about life. But then reality enters the picture and things get a bit more brutal. Great characters created from letters and conversation only! Very rewarding on many levels. Read full review

Review: Tropical Night Falling

User Review  - Pedro Zavala - Goodreads

a funny book about snooping, two old ladies from Buenos Aires are living now in Rio de Janeiro, and the main activity is talking about neighbors and family Read full review

Contents

Section 1
9
Section 2
21
Section 3
34
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

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About the author (1991)

Author Manuel Puig was born in General Villegas, Argentina on December 28, 1932. He was fascinated by the variety and richness, and at the same time, by the stultifying effects of pop culture. Most of his novels are technically parodies of some form of pop art while they portray the spiritual emptiness of the characters who are affected by these forms. Betrayed by Rita Hayworth (1968) is an innovative novel narrating through a variety of techniques the story of a young Argentine boy who lives vicariously through the movies. Puig uses the phenomenon of compulsive movie-going as a symbol for alienation and escape from reality. Heartbreak Tango (1969) evokes the spiritual emptiness of the Argentine provincial life in the 1930s and the vulgarity of popular music and the soap opera. His best known work, Kiss of the Spider Woman (1979), was adapted as a film in 1985 and as a Broadway musical in 1993. Puig, who always rejected the category of "homosexual writer," may nevertheless be Latin America's best example of a contemporary gay sensibility in his generally countercultural artistic stance. He died of a heart attack on July 22, 1990.

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