Outlines of Economic Theory (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1896 - 381 pages
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Page 1 - FLOWER in the crannied wall, I pluck you out of the crannies, I hold you here, root and all, in my hand, Little flower but if I could understand What you are, root and all, and all in all, I should know what God and man is.
Page 13 - But in the way in which this business is now carried on, not only the whole work is a peculiar trade, but it is divided into a number of branches, of which the greater part are likewise peculiar trades.
Page 342 - A man to whom God hath given riches, wealth, and honour, so that he wanteth nothing for his soul of all that he desireth, yet God giveth him not power to eat thereof, but a stranger eateth it: this is vanity, and it is an evil disease.
Page 342 - For who knoweth what is good for man in this life, all the days of his vain life which he spendeth as a shadow?
Page 13 - But if they had all wrought separately and independently, and without any of them having been educated to this peculiar business, they certainly could not each of them have made twenty, perhaps not one pin in a day...
Page 81 - Rent is that portion of the produce of the earth, which is paid to the landlord for the use of the original and indestructible powers of the soil.
Page 342 - The sleep of a labouring man is sweet, whether he eat little or much: but the abundance of the rich will not suffer him to sleep.
Page 13 - One man draws out the wire, another straightens it, a third cuts it, a fourth points it, a fifth grinds it at the top for receiving the head...
Page 342 - He that loveth silver shall not be satisfied with silver; nor he that loveth abundance with increase: this is also vanity.
Page 31 - Pleasure and pain are undoubtedly the ultimate objects of the calculus of economics. To satisfy our wants to the utmost with the least effort to procure the greatest amount of what is desirable at the expense of the least that is undesirable in other words, to maximise pleasure, is the problem of economics "(p.

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