incidents of the war humorous pathetic and descriptive  (Google eBook)

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Page 94 - For hours he suffered dumbly, without a moment's respite or a moment's murmuring. His limbs grew cold, his face damp, his lips white, and again and again he tore the covering off his breast, as if the lightest weight added to his agony ; yet, through it all, his eyes never lost their perfect serenity, and the man's soul seemed to sit therein, undaunted by the ills that vexed his flesh. One by one the men woke, and round the room appeared a circle of pale faces and watchful eyes, full of awe and pity...
Page 92 - Shall I write to your mother, now?" I asked, thinking that these sudden tidings might change all plans and purposes; but they did not; for the man received the order of the Divine Commander to march with the same unquestioning obedience with which the soldier had received that of the human one, doubtless remembering that the first led him to life, and the last to death. "No, ma'am; to Laurie just the same; he'll break it to her best, and I'll add a line to her myself when you get done.
Page 37 - And furious every charger neighed To join the dreadful revelry. Then shook the hills with thunder riven: Then rushed the steed to battle driven; And louder than the bolts of Heaven Far flashed the red artillery.
Page 90 - After that night, an hour of each evening that remained to him was devoted to his ease or pleasure. He could not talk much, for breath was precious, and he spoke in whispers; but from occasional conversations, I gleaned scraps of private history which only added to the affection and respect I felt for him. Once he asked me to write a letter, and as I settled pen and paper, I said, with an irrepressible glimmer of feminine curiosity, "Shall it be addressed to wife, or mother John?
Page 95 - The first red streak of dawn was warming the grey east, a herald of the coming sun; John saw it, and with the love of light which lingers in us to the end, seemed to read in it a sign of hope of help, for, over his whole face there broke that mysterious expression, brighter than any smile, which often comes to eyes that look their last.
Page 89 - You don't mean he must die, Doctor?" "Bless you, there's not the slightest hope for him; and you'd better tell him so before long; women have a way of doing such things comfortably, so I leave it to you. He won't last more than a day or two, at furthest.
Page 92 - He seemed to read the thought that troubled me, as he spoke so hopefully when there was no hope, for he suddenly added: "This is my first battle; do they think it's going to be my last?
Page 60 - Home again, home again, From a foreign shore, And oh it fills my soul with joy, To meet my friends once more...
Page 94 - ... yet, through it all, his eyes never lost their perfect serenity, and the man's soul seemed to sit therein, undaunted by the ills that vexed his flesh. One by one the men woke, and round the room appeared a circle of pale faces and watchful eyes, full of awe and pity ; for, though a stranger, John was beloved by all. Each man there had wondered at his patience, respected his piety, admired his fortitude, and now lamented his hard death ; for the influence of an upright nature had made itself deeply...
Page 308 - And they shall gnaw a file, and flee unto the mountains of Hepsidam, whar the lion roareth and the wang-doodle mourneth for his first-born.

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