The Isma'ilis: Their History and Doctrines (Google eBook)

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 20, 2007 - History - 772 pages
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The Isma'ilis represent the second largest Shii Muslim community after the Twelvers, and are today scattered throughout more than twenty-five countries in Asia, the Middle East, Africa, Europe and North America. This 2007 second edition of this authoritative book traces the history and doctrinal development of the Isma'ilis from their origins in the formative period of Islam to the present day, a period of more than twelve centuries. All the major phases of Isma'ili history are covered, including the pre-Fatimid period, the Fatimid 'golden age', the Tayyibi-Mustali period and the history of the Nizari Isma'ilis of Persia and Syria before the Mongol invasions. The final part traces the history of the modern Isma'ilis, particularly the socio-economic progress of the Nizari communities. The new edition is a thorough revision and incorporates new material, an expanded bibliography and new illustrations. It will be invaluable reading for students of Islamic and Middle Eastern history.
  

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This authoritative book traces the history and doctrinal development of the Isma'ili movement from its origins to the present day, a period of twelve centuries. It is the first comprehensive synthesis ... Read full review

Contents

progress in the study of the Ism a ıl ıs
1
2 Origins and early development of Sh ı ism
34
3 Early Ism a ılism
87
dawla and da wa
137
5 The later Fatimids and Musta lian Ism a ılism
238
6 Niz ar ı Ism a ıl history during the Alam ut period
301
7 The postAlam ut centuries and modern developments in Niz ar ı Ism a ıl history
403
Genealogical tables and lists
505
Glossary
514
Notes
523
Select bibliography
667
Index
697
Copyright

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Page 16 - There was a Fortress at the entrance to the Garden, strong enough to resist all the world, and there was no other way to get in. He kept at his Court a number of the youths of the country, from twelve to twenty years of age, such as had a taste for soldiering, and to these he used to tell tales about Paradise, just as Mahommet had been wont to do, and they believed in him just as the Saracens believe in Mahommet.
Page 17 - Go thou and slay So and So; and when thou returnest my Angels shall bear thee into Paradise. And shouldst thou die, natheless even so will I send my Angels to carry thee back into Paradise.' So he caused them to believe; and thus there was no order of his that they would not affront any peril to execute, for the great desire they had to get back into that Paradise of his. And in this manner the Old One got his people to murder any one whom he desired to get rid of.
Page 16 - And when he wanted one of his _Ashishin_ to send on any mission, he would cause that potion whereof I spoke to be given to one of the youths in the garden, and then had him carried into his Palace. So when the young man awoke, he found himself in the Castle, and no longer in that Paradise; whereat he was not over well pleased.
Page 17 - So; and when thou returnest my angels shall bear thee into Paradise. And should'st thou die, nevertheless even so will I send my Angels to carry thee back into Paradise." So he caused them to believe; and thus there was no order of his that they would not affront any peril to execute, for the great desire they had to get back into that Paradise of his.
Page 16 - Mahommet gave of his Paradise, to wit, that it should be a beautiful garden running with conduits of wine and milk and honey and water, and full of lovely women for the delectation of all its inmates. And sure enough the Saracens of those parts believed that it was Paradisel Now no man was allowed to enter the Garden save those whom he intended to be his Ashishin.
Page xxi - JAOS Journal of the American Oriental Society. JBBRAS Journal of the Bombay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society. JBORS Journal of the Bihar and Orissa Research Society.
Page 16 - ... water, and full of lovely women for the delectation of all its inmates. And sure enough the Saracens of those parts believed that it was Paradise ! Now no man was allowed to enter the Garden save those whom he intended to be his ASHISHIN. There was a Fortress at the entrance to the Garden, strong enough to resist all the world, and there was no other way to get in. He kept at his Court a number of the youths of the country, from 12 to 20 years of age, such as had a taste for soldiering, and to...

About the author (2007)

Farhad Daftary is Associate Director and Head of the Department of Academic Research and Publications at the Institute of Ismaili Studies. An authority on Ismaili history, he has written and edited numerous books, including Mediaeval Isma'ili History and Thought (1996), Ismaili Literature: A Bibliography of Sources and Studies (2004) and Ismailis in Medieval Muslim Societies (2005).

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