Forestry Quarterly, Volume 17 (Google eBook)

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Page 473 - Every tax ought to be levied at the time, or in the manner in which it is most likely to be convenient for the contributor to pay it.
Page 967 - But it is recognized that the State as quasi-sovereign and representative of the interests of the public has a standing in court to protect the atmosphere, the water and the forests within its territory, irrespective of the assent or dissent of the private owners of the land most immediately concerned...
Page 458 - ... with these memorials, we can easily discover ways in which we may simply and spontaneously pay our tribute to them. We can keep fresh our memory of what they gave; and we can perpetuate their names in familiar places. It has been happily suggested that we may do this by adorning with young trees, each named for a fallen soldier, our waysides, our yards, and our pleasure places. And in most of our states Arbor Day is at hand. This year we may give to that day a meaning more profound, a purpose...
Page 119 - The public in its own protection should prohibit destructive methods of cutting that injure the community and th'e public at large. With the cooperation of the public, constructive measures of forestry are feasible. They should be mandatory. The States should adopt a policy of taxation of forests that would encourage rather than hinder the practice of forestry. Present tax policies tend to force early cutting and add to the burden of holding young forests. Other factors also cause premature and wasteful...
Page 755 - WHEREAS, the increased productivity of industry resulting from scientific research is a most potent factor in the ever-increasing struggle of the workers to raise their standards of living, and the importance of this factor must steadily increase since there is a limit beyond which the average standard of living of the whole population can not progress by the usual methods of readjustment, which limit can only be raised by research and the utilization of the results of research in industry...
Page 907 - A national policy of forestry seeks the protection and beneficial utilization of our present forest resources, the renewal after cutting of forests on lands not needed for agriculture and settlement, the stability of forest industries and of satisfactory conditions for forest workers, and the restoration of forest growth on lands now unproductive and idle. The...
Page 755 - ... already active; therefore be it Resolved, by the American Federation of Labor in convention assembled, that a broad program of scientific and technical research is of major importance to the national welfare and should be fostered in every way by the federal government, and that the activities of the government itself in such research should be adequately and generously supported in order that the work may be greatly strengthened...
Page 356 - ... to private owners. The burden of carrying the timber and properly caring for it was transferred from the public to private hands. Whether they like it or not, the private owners have the problem of the right handling of a large part of our forests actually on their hands. AN IMPOSSIBLE SITUATION. On the other hand, the public has a very essential interest in the question of keeping the lands in a producing condition so as to render a maximum of service, in supporting industries and local communities,...
Page 908 - There should be an extensive program of public forests, owned by the nation, by the states, by municipalities, and, too, by quasipublic institutions and organizations. The public forests today comprise about 25 per cent of the total forest area of the country. They should be extended to include ultimately from 40 to 50 per cent. In any plan of extensive public holdings, whether federal or state, provision should be made for returning to the communities a share of the receipts, as is done in case...
Page 205 - The Laboratory of Forest Pathology of the Bureau of Plant Industry, US Department of Agriculture, Dr. James R. Weir in charge, has been removed from Missoula, Montana to Spokane, Washington, where it will be permanently installed in a fire-proof building. The most intensive work of this laboratory is centered in the great white pine forests of Idaho. To promote pathological investigation in this region, a permanent field station will be established, also a forest pathological museum. All future communications...

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