How Teachers Taught: Constancy and Change in American Classrooms, 1890-1990

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Teachers College Press, 1993 - Education - 359 pages
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In this newly revised edition of his acclaimed book, Larry Cuban returns to his pioneering inquiry into the history of teaching practice in the United States, responds to criticisms, and incorporates the scholarship of the last ten years. While not abandoning his basic thesis of the remarkable continuity in teacher-based instruction, Cuban now examines more closely the phenomenon of "hybrids" of student-and teacher-centered pedagogy, and finds many instances of classroom change sufficient to give pause to those who see futility in classroom reform.
  

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good book explaing the techniques and better knowledges teaches adapted over time to possibly create a better learning environment

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pagina 24

Contents

Introduction
1
Progressivism and Classroom Practice 18901990
21
New York 19201940
46
Denver 19201940
76
Washington D C
92
19201940
115
Open Classrooms and Alternative Schools
147
Local and National Snapshots of Classroom Practices
205
So What? Implications for Policymakers Practitioners and Researchers
272
Overall Implications for Those Who Seek to Reform Classroom Teaching
276
Appendix
291
Notes
295
References
327
Index
347
About the Author
359
Copyright

Constancy and Change in the Classroom 18901990
241

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About the author (1993)

Larry Cuban is Professor Emeritus of Education at Stanford University and past president of the American Educational Research Association.

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