The Sanskrit Language (Google eBook)

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Motilal Banarsidass Publ., Jan 1, 2001 - Sanskrit language - 438 pages
3 Reviews
The Sanskrit Language presents a systematic and comprehensive historical account of the developments in phonology and morphology. This is the only book in English which treats the structure of the Sanskrit language in its relation to the other Indo-European languages and throws light on the significance of the discovery of Sanskrit. It is this discovery that contributed to the study of the comparative philology of the Indo-European languages and eventually the whole science of modern linguistics. Besides drawing on the works of Brugmann and Wackernagel, Professor Burrow incorporates in this book material from Hittite and taking into account various verbal constructions as found in Hittite, he relates the perfect form of Sanskrit to it. The profound influence that the Dravidian languages had on the structure of the Sanskrit language has also been presented lucidly and with a balanced perspective. In a nutshell, the present work can be called, without exaggeration, a pioneering endeavour in the field of linguistics and Indology.
  

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Contents

SANSKRIT AND INDOEUROPEAN
1
OUTLINES OF THE HISTORY OF SANSKRIT
35
PHONOLOGY
67
THE FORMATION OF NOUNS
118
THE DECLENSION OF NOUNS
220
NUMERALS PRONOUNS INDECLINABLES
258
THE VERB
289
LOANWORDS IN SANSKRIT
374
APPENDIX TO THE THIRD EDITION
390
SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
399
INDEX
402
Copyright

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Page 6 - The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all three, without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists...
Page 6 - ... some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists: there is a similar reason, though not quite so forcible, for supposing that both the Gothick and the Celtick, though blended with a very different idiom, had the same origin with the Sanscrit; and the old Persian might be added to the same family, if this were the place for discussing any question concerning the antiquities of Persia.

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