Creole Families of New Orleans (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Macmillan, 1921 - Creoles - 465 pages
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Contents

I
3
II
9
III
23
IV
59
V
67
VI
72
VII
133
VIII
154
XXII
323
XXIII
337
XXIV
343
XXV
350
XXVI
357
XXVII
368
XXVIII
383
XXIX
392

IX
159
X
169
XI
201
XII
212
XIII
221
XIV
236
XV
239
XVI
256
XVII
269
XVIII
291
XIX
305
XX
313
XXI
318
XXX
397
XXXI
406
XXXII
413
XXXIII
419
XXXIV
423
XXXV
429
XXXVI
435
XXXVII
443
XXXVIII
446
XXXIX
452
XL
461
Copyright

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Page 243 - Sir, to accept my regrets, and a renewed assurance of the most entire consideration, with which I have the honor to be, Sir, your very humble and very obedient servant, DE CASTRIES.
Page 248 - The facility with which sugar planters amass wealth is almost incredible. ... It is not uncommon with 220 working hands to make from ten to fourteen thousand dollars; and there are several planters whose field negroes do not exceed forty who make more than twenty thousand dollars a year.
Page 167 - Kentuckians have had, and will continue to have forever, to take the most active part in any undertaking tending to open to them the free navigation of the Mississippi. "The French republicans, in their sublime constitutional act, have proffered their protection to all those nations who may have the courage to shake off the yoke of tyranny. The Louisianians have the most sacred right to it. They are French, but have been sacrificed to despotism by arbitrary power. The honor, the glory, the duty of...
Page 47 - Sir, I tell you that you have inflicted upon him unjust provocation, and I give you distinctly to understand that I take up the glove in his behalf; and, Sir, I trust that you will not complain of my not being a native of the country, since I descend from those ancient warriors who conquered the country, and here represent six generations of Louisianians. Fortunately for me, all your fine quotations are lost upon me. I have never read any of those works which are supposed necessary to make a logical...
Page 256 - L'oubli reprend le nom. VI O révolutions ! j'ignore, Moi, le moindre des matelots, Ce que Dieu dans l'ombre élabore Sous le tumulte de vos flots. La foule vous hait et vous raille. Mais qui sait comment Dieu travaille? Qui sait si l'onde qui tressaille, Si le cri des gouffres amers, Si la trombe aux ardentes serres, Si les éclairs et les tonnerres, Seigneur, ne sont pas nécessaires A la perle que font les mers!
Page 71 - ... them to so much uneasiness, that d'Aubant contrived to leave the country soon after, and went to Paris, where his wife having met the Marshal of Saxe in the garden of the Tuileries, and being recognized by him, escaped detection with the greatest difficulty. D'Aubant departed with the grade of major for the Island of Bourbon, where he resided for a considerable time. In 1754, on his death, his widow returned to Paris with a daughter, the only offspring of her union with d'Aubant, and in 1771,...
Page 62 - Go tell your master that we are here by the will of the people and that we shall not leave except at the point of the bayonet.
Page 71 - ... be carried there by any physical process ? Is it second sight, magnetic perception, supernatural intuition, or the electric traveling of the mind ? Are there mysterious carriers of news through heaven and earth ? Certain it is, that although d'Aubant and his wife kept their own secret and lived in almost monastic retirement, rumors about their wonderful history were so rife in the colony, and the attention of which they became the objects, subjected them to so much uneasiness, that...
Page 147 - The place," writes the English authority, an officer during the campaign, "was as wild as it is possible to imagine. Gaze where we might, nothing could be seen except a huge marsh covered with tall reeds. The marsh became gradually less and less continuous, being intersected by wide spots of firm ground ; the reeds gave place by degrees to wood, and the wood to enclosed fields.
Page 286 - Roi," at Paris. Perkins, delegated by the Society to make researches in Europe for interesting historical matter relative to Louisiana, secured the services of M. Pierre Margry, to make a transcript, chronologically arranged, of all the papers in the different archives of the French government, referring to Louisiana, from the date of Iberville's landing to the time of its cession to the United States. This undertaking, vast as it proved to be, was superbly carried out by Margry; and the pride of...

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