To Shining Sea: A History of the United States Navy, 1775-1998

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University of Oklahoma Press, 1999 - History - 630 pages
4 Reviews

To Shining Sea is a landmark work of naval history--the most comprehensive and authoritative narrative account of American sea power written in recent times. From John Paul Jonesís defiant cry "I have not yet begun to fight," to the war in the Persian Gulf, Stephen Howarth chronicles the epic story of the United States Navy. Here are the first engagements of the tiny Continental Navy, the fight against the Barbary pirates, the watershed clash of the Monitor and the Merrimack, the development--from blueprint to battleship--of the U.S. Navyís first modern capital ships and submarines, the great battles of World War II in the Pacific, and the navyís deployment in Vietnam and in the Persian Gulf. For this edition, Howarth provides a new afterword discussing recent developments in the U.S. Navy.

  

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On page 6, the author has made a rather bright and shining error for
those of us interested in genealogy. The paragraph that starts with this statement is absolutely wrong:
"The schooner was
named Hannah after the wife of her owner, Colonel George Glover."
Colonel John (not George) Glover of the Marblehead Mariners was the owner of the Hannah, named after his wife, Hannah Gale. Colonel John Glover later was given the title of Brig. General by George Washington and played a vital role in helping to defeat the British during the Revolution.
 

Review: To Shining Sea: A History of the United States Navy, 1775-1998

User Review  - Fredrick Danysh - Goodreads

A history of the US navy as it grew in maturity and power from sailing ships to nuclear power. Read full review

Contents

RESTRICTION 17751793
3
What Think You of an American Fleet?
5
The Rebel Fleet Was Attacked and Destroyed
17
Without a Respectable Navy
29
Have Been Forced to Surrender
44
REACHING 17941815
53
Open Hostilities
55
A Squadron of Observation
67
Wow But It Was Great Work
306
The Battles of the Future
323
Seeds of Misunderstanding and Grave Trouble
335
RELUCTANCE 19331941
355
Our Citizens Do Not Want War
357
If You Attack Us We Shall Crush You
371
RENOWN 19411945
385
Those Splendid ShipsLost
387

Something Drastic
79
Much Sensation in America
88
The Lake and the Sea Service
104
The Americans Taught Us a Lesson
114
Our Peaceful Confederacy
127
Disputes and Collisions
141
We Will Greet You with Bloody Hands
153
Shocks and Throes and Convulsions
167
Many Exciting Sundays
180
Vicksburg Must of Necessity Fall
191
The Rebs Have Got Good Courage
202
REACTION 18651881
213
So Neglected of Late Years
215
Steam and Steel 18811998
227
RECONSTRUCTION 18811897
229
Approaching Under Steam
231
REVEILLE 18981918
245
A Feeling of Uneasy Excitement
247
To Cheer the Spanish
258
Such a Fleet Such a Day
271
How to Tell Ships from Automobiles
289
Distant Wings
400
Confusion and Fury
411
Bravo Keep at It
429
Action Against a Retreating Enemy
433
A Sea Fight Beyond All Others
451
Lords of the Ocean Lords of the Air
467
RESHAPING 19451963
473
The Elimination of War Itself
475
Under Way on Nuclear Power
488
Eyeball to Eyeball
499
RECKONING 19641998
511
That Bitch of a War
513
We Must Have National Goals
523
We Must Not Appear as Terrorists
537
Beyond the Pillars of Hercules
554
Here Be Dragons
563
Source Notes
575
Bibliography
599
Index
607
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Stephen Howarth is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and the Royal Geographical Society and Life Member of the United States Naval Institute. Among his books are Men of War: Great Naval Leaders of World War II, The Fighting Ships of the Rising Sun , and (with David Howarth) Lord Nelson .

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