Reading the fights

Front Cover
Prentice Hall Press, 1990 - Sports & Recreation - 305 pages
2 Reviews
Fans of tough, hard-hitting prose and tough, hard-hitting men will find plenty to cheer about as the power and the passion, the poetry and the pain of big-time boxing explode on the page. The book is championship material!

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DinadansFriend - LibraryThing

Oates' other book about boxing, and as interesting as the first. An anthology rather than direct writing. Read full review

Review: Reading the Fights

User Review  - Bax - Goodreads

A solid anthology of boxing essays from a wide variety of writers. Read full review

Contents

Ronald Levao READING THE FIGHTS
1
Gerald Early THREE NOTES TOWARD A CULTURAL DEFI
20
I ONLY LIKE IT BETTER WHEN THE PAIN
39
Copyright

15 other sections not shown

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About the author (1990)

Joyce Carol Oates was born in 1938 in Upstate, New York. She attended Syracuse University and graduated as Valedictorian. She then attended University of Wisconsin where she earned an M. A. By the time she was 47 years old, she had published at least that many separate books, including 16 full-length novels and more than a dozen collections of short stories. Some of her works were done under the pseudonym Rosamund Smith. She has also written numerous poems collected in several volumes, at least three plays, many critical essays, and articles and reviews on various subjects while fulfilling her obligations as a professor of English at the University of Windsor, where with her husband Raymond Smith she edited the Ontario Review, which the couple has continued since moving to Princeton in 1978. She has earned a reputation as indubitably one of our most prolific writers and very likely one of our best. Her fiction alone demonstrates considerable variety, ranging from direct naturalism to complex experiments in form. However, what chiefly makes her work her own is a quality of psychological realism, an uncanny ability to bring to the surface an underlying sense of foreboding or a threat of violence that seems to lurk just around the corner from the everyday domestic lives she depicts so realistically. Her first six novels, including Them (1969), which won the National Book Award, express these qualities in varying ways. she is also the recipient of an NEA grant, a Guggenheim fellowship, the PEN/Malamud Lifetime Achievement Award, and the F. Scott Fitzgerald Award for Lifetime Achievement in American Literature. She resides in New Jersey.

Daniel Halpern was born on September 11, 1945, in Syracuse, N.Y. The son of Irving Halpern, a scrap dealer, and Rosemary Glueck, Halpern received his Master of Fine Arts from Columbia University in 1972. Halpern previously held positions at Princeton University, New School of Social Research, and Columbia University as instructor in poetry. He began working at Ecco Press in New York City in 1969, and later became editor-in-chief. Daniel Halpern, who is also a freelance editor, has worked on more than two dozen books, including Traveling on Credit, The American Poetry Anthology, Plays in One Act, and The Art of the Tale: An International Anthology of Short Stories. Among Halpern's awards and honors as an editor are the Jessie Rehder Poetry Award, YMHA Discovery Award, National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, and the Great Lakes Colleges National Book Award.

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