The Comprehensive Method of Teaching Reading, Book 1 (Google eBook)

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D.C. Heath & Company, 1902 - Readers (Primary)
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Page 108 - THE SWING HOW do you like to go up in a swing, Up in the air so blue ? Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing Ever a child can do ! Up in the air and over the wall, Till I can see so wide, Rivers and trees and cattle and all Over the countryside Till I look down on the garden green, Down on the roof so brown Up in the air I go flying again, Up in the air and down ! XXXIV TIME TO RISE A BIRDIE with a yellow bill Hopped upon the window sill, Cocked his shining eye and said: "Ain't you 'shamed,...
Page 96 - The Rainbow comes and goes, And lovely is the Rose ; The Moon doth with delight Look round her when the heavens are bare ; Waters on a starry night Are beautiful and fair ; The Sunshine is a glorious birth ; But yet I know, where'er I go, That there hath passed away a glory from the earth.
Page 1 - How many deeds of kindness A little child may do, Although it has so little strength, And little wisdom too? It wants a loving spirit Much more than strength, to prove How many things a child may do For others by its love.
Page 34 - Rockabye Baby, on the tree top, When the wind blows the cradle will rock, When the bough breaks the cradle will fall, Down will come baby, cradle and all.
Page 47 - Buttercups and daisies, Oh ! the pretty flowers, Coming ere the spring-time To tell of sunny hours. While the trees are leafless, While the fields are bare, Buttercups and daisies Spring up here and there.
Page 74 - My native country, thee, Land of the noble free, Thy name I love : I love thy rocks and rills, Thy woods and templed hills; My heart with rapture thrills Like that above.
Page 54 - A MAN of words and not of deeds Is like a garden full of weeds...
Page 54 - One step, and then another, And the longest walk is ended ; One stitch and then another, And the largest rent is mended One brick upon another, And the highest wall is made ; One flake upon another, And the deepest snow is laid.
Page 93 - For flowers that bloom about our feet, For tender grass, so fresh, so sweet, For song of bird and hum of bee, For all things fair we hear or see, Father in heaven, we thank Thee. For blue of stream and blue of sky, For pleasant shade of branches high, For fragrant air and cooling breeze, For beauty of the blooming trees, Father in heaven, we thank Thee.
Page 98 - Even a child is known by his doings, whether his work be pure, and whether it be right.

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