Empty Words: Buddhist Philosophy and Cross-cultural Interpretation

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 2002 - Philosophy - 306 pages
2 Reviews
This volume collects Jay Garfield's essays on Madhyamaka, Yog-ac-ara, Buddhist ethics and cross-cultural hermeneutics. The first part addresses Madhyamaka, supplementing Garfield's translation of Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way (OUP, 1995), a foundational philosophical text by the Buddhist saint Nagarjuna. Garfield then considers the work of philosophical rivals, and sheds important light on the relation of Nagarjuna's views to other Buddhist and non-Buddhist philosophical positions.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Empty Words: Buddhist Philosophy and Cross-Cultural Interpretation

User Review  - Gwern - Goodreads

Much of it is relatively technical, especially the parts dealing with Nagarjuna, and not suited to those who haven't read the key texts. I did enjoy the comparison with Sextus Empiricus a lot, though. Read full review

Review: Empty Words: Buddhist Philosophy and Cross-Cultural Interpretation

User Review  - Rohan - Goodreads

Really top-notch scholarship. The metaphysics and epistemology are really great, the essays on liberal political theory less so. There are enough typos to get on your nerves, which is weird since this ... Read full review

Contents

Epoche and Sunyata Skepticism East and West
7
Dependent Arising and the Emptiness of Emptiness Why Did Nagarjuna Start with Causation?
28
Emptiness and Positionlessness Do the Madhyamika Relinquish All Views?
50
Nagarjunas Theory of Causality Implications Sacred and Profane
73
Nagarjuna and the Limits of Thought with Graham Priest
90
YOGACARA
111
Three Natures and Three Naturelessnesses Comments Concerning Cittamatra Conceptual Categories
113
Vasubandhus Treatise on the Three Natures A Translation and Commentary
132
ETHICS AND HERMENEUTICS
189
Human Rights and Compassion Toward a Unified Moral Framework
191
Buddhism and Democracy
210
The Satya in Satyagraha Samdhong Rinpoches Approach to Nonviolence
224
Temporality and Alterity Dimensions of Hermeneutic Distance
233
Philosophy Religion and the Hermeneutic Imperative
255
Notes
265
References
295

Western Idealism through Indian Eyes A Cittamatra Reading of Berkeley Kant and Schopenhauer
156
Sounds of Silence Ineffability and the Limits of Language in Madhyamaka and Yogacara
174

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information