The lives of the most eminent British painters, sculptors, and architects, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1830 - Artists, British
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Page 145 - TIGER! Tiger! burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry? In what distant deeps or skies Burnt the fire of thine eyes? On what wings dare he aspire? What the hand dare seize the fire?
Page 184 - Thames' waters flow. O what a multitude they seem'd, these flowers of London town! Seated in companies they sit with radiance all their own. The hum of multitudes was there, but multitudes of lambs, Thousands of little boys and girls raising their innocent hands. Now like a mighty wind they raise to heaven the voice of song, Or like harmonious thunderings the seats of heaven among. Beneath them sit the aged men, wise guardians of the poor; Then cherish pity, lest you drive an angel from your door.
Page 184 - LAUGHING SONG. WHEN the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by ; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it ; When the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene ; When Mary and Susan and Emily With their sweet round mouths sing - Ha ha he...
Page 151 - Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me Pipe a song about a lamb ; So I piped with' merry cheer. Piper, pipe that song again So I piped he wept to hear.
Page 145 - TO THE MUSES. WHETHER on Ida's shady brow Or in the chambers of the East, The chambers of the Sun, that now From ancient melody have ceased ; Whether in heaven ye wander fair Or the green corners of the earth, Or the blue regions of the air, Where the melodious winds have birth...
Page 37 - West has conquered ; he has treated his subject as it ought to be treated ; I retract my objections. I foresee that this picture will not only become one of the most popular, but will occasion a revolution in art.
Page 168 - What is it that builds a house and plants a garden, but the definite and determinate ? What is it that distinguishes honesty from knavery, but the hard and wirey line of rectitude and certainty in the actions and intentions ? Leave out this line, and you leave out life itself; all is chaos again, and the line of the almighty must be drawn out upon it before man or beast can exist.
Page 146 - What the hammer? What the chain? In what furnace was thy brain? What the anvil? What dread grasp Dare its deadly terrors clasp? When the stars threw down their spears, And water'd heaven with their tears, Did He smile His work to see? Did He who made the lamb make thee...
Page 217 - ... with all the modes of life. His character requires that he estimate the happiness and misery of every condition; observe the power of all the passions in all their combinations, and trace the changes of the human mind as they are modified by various institutions and accidental influences of climate or custom, from the sprightliness of infancy to the despondence of decrepitude.
Page 151 - WHEN my mother died I was very young, And my father sold me while yet my tongue Could scarcely cry " 'weep ! 'weep ! 'weep ! 'weep !" So your chimneys I sweep, and in soot I sleep.

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