Williamson's guide through Lincoln (Google eBook)

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J. Williamson, 1890 - History - 160 pages
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Page 108 - ... the lid, was found to contain a second coffin of lead. The coffin was rudely formed of plates of lead unsoldered. Its contents were in such a state of decomposition that it was difficult to determine their nature. It is certain, however, that these were not remains of a body nothing more than decayed vestments, or perhaps linen cloths in which a body had once been swathed. Among the decaying fabrics were very fine gold threads, indicating a material of some richness, It was evident from the...
Page 40 - ... cathedral; the head of the doorway also forms an arch to carry the fire-place and chimney above. There are no marks of an original fire-place on the ground floor, and the principal room appears to have been up stairs. Some of the windows are good Norman of two lights with a shaft between. The house is small, and seems to have consisted of two rooms only, one on the ground floor, and one above : these may, however, have been originally divided by partitions : the interior has entirely lost all...
Page 19 - Hole popularly given to the locality, a name tolling of dark deeds of blood, and the concealment of the corpses of the victims in the river. On the eastern side of the bridge is a conduit, surmounted by an obelisk, which in 1763, took the place of an Early English Wayside Chapel, dedicated to St. Thomas of Canterbury (Becket), which, after having been let as a dwelling-house, and used as a hall for the tanners and butchers of the city, and aftoi-wards as a chandler's shop, was then finally pulled...
Page 21 - HANK. required all the energy aiid decision of Sir Joseph Banks to overcome their scruples. Sir Joseph threatened that, if they refused to deepen the river, a navigable canal, in connection with the Horncastle Navigation Act, should be carried round the lower part of the city, independent of it altogether. The municipality were then brought to reason, and the necessary works were executed, soon after 1792, greatly to the advantage of the city. For a considerable distance down High Street there...
Page 40 - House of Lincoln is one of the most celebrated and best known of the domestic remains of the early part of the twelfth century. It is small, and seems to have consisted of two rooms only one on the ground floor, and one above. The chief room was, as usual, up-stairs...
Page 128 - It owes its origin to the Society of Industry, for the Southern Division of the parts of Lindsey, who, August 5, 1785, issued cards for an assembly at the Windmill Inn, Alford, at which free admission was given to all ladies appearing in gowns and petticoats of woollen stuff spun and woven in Lincolnshire, and gentlemen appearing without any cotton or silk in their dress except stockings. The manufacture having been taken up in high circles, it became fashionable for ladies to spin the yarn for their...
Page 129 - A colour that chosen at the first Alford ball was orange was declared by her at the commencement of the year, in which all ladies were to appear, thus ensuring the wearing of new dresses on the occasion. Lady Banks, the wife of Sir Joseph Banks, was patroness of the first ball held at Lincoln. Notwithstanding the " laudable zeal shown by the county ladies in support of their infant manufactory...
Page 40 - ... on the ground floor, and one above. The chief room was, as usual, up-stairs, and had the luxury of a fireplace and chimney, supported on the archway of the door below ; the room below had no fireplace. The front towards the street is tolerably perfect. The entrance doorway has a richly-carved and moulded arch. The windows above are good Norman, of two lights, with a shaft between, under rich mouldings. In the reign of Edward I. this house was inhabited by a rich Jewess, named Belasel of Wallingford.
Page 43 - Jew seen in England after All Saints' Day, 1290, was sentenced to be hanged; their property was confiscated by the Crown, and was granted on easy terms to their fellowcitizens. The house now before us was transferred to Walter of THE BOMAX GATE.
Page 20 - ... as a chandler's shop, was then finally pulled down. The ancient moulded ribs which bear up the arches of the bridge are well seen by descending the steps leading to the waterside on either side of the conduit. The Foss Dyke, the navigable canal dug by the Romans to afford a water communication between the Witham and the Trent, into which it debouches at Torksey, and deepened by Henry I., had fallen into neglect, and was considered of so little value that it was leased by the Corporation to Mr....

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