Vichy France: Old Guard and New Order 1940-1944

Front Cover
Columbia University Press, 2001 - History - 415 pages
3 Reviews

Robert O. Paxton's classic study of the aftermath of France's sudden collapse under Nazi invasion utilizes captured German archives and other contemporary materials to construct a strong and disturbing account of the Vichy period in France. With a new introduction and updated bibliography, Vichy France demonstrates that the collaborationist government of Marshal Pétain did far more than merely react to German pressures. The Vichy leaders actively pursued their own double agenda -- internally, the authoritarian and racist "national revolution," and, externally, an attempt to persuade Hitler to accept this new France as a partner in his new Europe.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This book is scholarly and densely written in places but quite enlightening. It gives a detailed, nuanced account of the Vichy government and describes all of the many factors at play before and during 1940-1944. For instance, I had no idea how seminal the influence of the aftermath of the Franco-Prussian War was to French reactions to 20th century events. Paxton shows that many little understood forces were at play during the Vichy years and that 'collaboration' was not always considered despicable. He shows that it is not enough to think in black and white terms when studying this time period. If you are interested in a fleshed out examination of the whole spectrum of ideas, thought, and actions of the era, and you are willing to slog through some sections of heavy reading, this is the book for you. 

Review: Vichy France: Old Guard and New Order 1940-1944

User Review  - Michael Selvin - Goodreads

Good basic summary of France during WWII. Read full review

Contents

I
3
II
51
III
63
IV
69
V
92
VI
101
VII
109
VIII
131
XXI
249
XXII
259
XXIV
268
XXV
273
XXVI
280
XXVII
291
XXVIII
299
XXIX
309

IX
148
X
153
XI
165
XII
168
XIII
185
XIV
200
XV
210
XVI
221
XVII
228
XVIII
234
XIX
241
XX
243
XXX
326
XXXI
330
XXXII
352
XXXIII
357
XXXIV
374
XXXV
380
XXXVI
385
XXXVII
387
XXXVIII
391
XXXIX
392
XL
417
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2001)

Robert G. Henricks is a professor of religion at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, where he has taught since 1976. One of the most acclaimed authorities on classic Asian literature today, he has translated the highly regarded Lao-Tzu Te-Tao Ching and is the author of other books, including Philosophy and Argumentation in Third Century China and The Poetry of Han-Shan.

Bibliographic information