The school of Venice (Google eBook)

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W. Simpkin and R. Marshall, Stationers'-Hall Court, Ludgate Street., 1828 - Painting
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Page 322 - Io mi son un che, quando Amore spira, noto, ed a quel modo Che detta dentro, vo significando. O frate, issa vegg...
Page 367 - Sir James Thornhill was preferred to paint the cupola of St. Paul's. Lanzi says, "he did not early acquire a good knowledge of design, but he afterwards succeeded in this object, which he cultivated with extreme assiduity in the academies, even in mature age. The forms of his figures are composed with beauty, dignity, and grace, like those of Paul Veronese ; the attitudes are more than usually natural, prompt, and varied ; and the composition appears to have been managed with truth and good sense....
Page 143 - ... middle tints he formed the work of the lower parts ; and having very resolutely drawn the other parts with the extremities stronger perhaps than in nature, he gave to objects that peculiar aspect which presents them, as it were, more lively and pleasing than the truth. Thus in...
Page 99 - ... educated in the school of the Bellini. But, impelled by a spirit conscious of its own powers, he despised that minuteness...
Page 42 - ... of the less skillful. Lanzi says that after Antonello returned to Venice from Flanders, he concealed the discovery from every one. except Domenico Veneziano. who is known to have availed himself of it for many years, both at Venice and elsewhere. During this period. Antonello visited other places, and' more especially Milan, whence he returned to Venice for the second time, and, as it is said, "received a public pension...
Page 250 - The church and portico of St. Mark remain an invaluable museum of the kind, where, commencing with the eleventh century, we may trace the gradual progress of design belonging to each age up to the present, as exhibited in many works in mosaic, beginning from the Greeks and continued by the Italians. They chiefly consist of histories from the Old and New Testament, and at the same time furnish very interesting notices relating to civil and ecclesiastical antiquity.
Page 112 - We have put the version of St. Jerome between the Hebrew and Septuagint, as between the synagogue and eastern church, which are like the two thieves, the one on the right and the other on the left hand, and Jesus, that is the Roman church, in the middle : for this alone, being founded upon a solid rock, remains always immovable in the truth, while the others deviate from the proper sense of Scripture...
Page 100 - ... freedom and audacity of manner in which the perfection of painting consists. In this view he may be said to be an inventor; no artist before his time having acquired that mastery of his pencil so hardy and determined in its strokes, and producing such an effect in the distance. From that period he continued to ennoble his manner, rendering the contours more round and ample, the foreshortenings more new, the expression of the countenance more warm and lively, as well as the motions of his figures.
Page 28 - S. vii. 368) began to make himself known as early as 1401 by producing an altar piece at San Cassiano di Pesaro, with the signature Jacometto de Flor. A much nobler work is a coronation of the Virgin in the Cathedral of Ceneda, very rich in figure?. A manuscript of the lives of the bishops of that place declares it to have been executed "abeximioillins temporis pictore Jacobello de Flor, 1432.

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