Quaker idyls (Google eBook)

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Books for Libraries Press, 1894 - Fiction - 223 pages
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Page 228 - A glorious story, which cannot be too warmly recommended to all who love a tale that stirs the blood. Perhaps not the least among its many good qualities is the fact that its chivalry is of the nineteenth, not of the sixteenth, century ; that it is a tale of brave men and true, and of a fair woman of to-day. The Englishman who saves the king ... is as interesting a knight as was Bayard. . . . The story holds the reader's attention from first to last.
Page 228 - Told with an old-time air of romance that gives the fascination of an earlier day; an air of good faith, almost of religious chivalry, givees rality to their extravagance. . . . Marks Mr. Hope as a wit, if he were not a romancer.
Page 229 - * Told with an old-time air of romance that gives the fascination of an earlier day; an air of good faith, almost of religious chivalry, gives reality to their extravagance. . . Marks Mr. Hope as a wit, if he were not a romancer."— Nation.
Page 27 - FG by the hand, did on this solemn occasion declare, that he took her to be his wife ; promising, through Divine assistance, to be unto her a faithful and loving husband, until...
Page 228 - More plentifully charged with humor, and the plot is every whit as original as that of Zenda . . . returns to the entrancing manner of ' The Prisoner of Zenda.' . . . The whole game of playing at revolution is pictured with such nearness and intimacy of view that the wildest things happen as though they were every-day occurrences. . . . Two triumphs of picturesque description— the overthrow and escape of the President, and the night attack on the bank. The charmingly wicked Christina is equal...
Page 234 - Many a ponderous and voluminous work o_n mediaeval history and art, requiring months for its study, is really far less valuable than this little book.
Page 233 - Certain to attract wide attention; . . . thoroughly interesting. . . . The spirit of his work is such as to deserve respectful attention from every scientific mind.
Page 229 - Displays a piquant ingenuity of invention. It is all very impossible and very fascinating. . . The reader is kept constantly alert for new developments, which are never quite what is anticipated. Like all the rest of the author's books, it provides capital entertainment.
Page 228 - Edition. With portrait and notice of the author. " A highly clever performance, with little touches that recall both Balzac and Meredith. ... Is endowed with exceeding originality."— New York Times.
Page 233 - He repudiates the idea of the supernatural altogether, and in this he is in accord with the best thought of the day. . . . Interesting and logical.

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