Yellow Face

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Dramatists Play Service Inc, Jan 1, 2008 - Drama - 65 pages
8 Reviews

"A pungent play of ideas with a big heart. "Yellow Face" brings to the national discussion about race a sense of humor a mile wide, an even-handed treatment and a hopeful, healing vision of a world that could be."--"Variety"

"Charming, touching, and cunningly organized as well as funny, [with] an Ibsenite reach and stature far beyond any issues of Hwang's self-image."--"The Village Voice"

"It's about our country, about public image, about "face,"" says David Henry Hwang about his latest work, a mock documentary that puts Hwang himself center stage as it explores both Asian identity as well as race in America. The play begins with the 1990s controversy over color-blind casting for "Miss Saigon," before it spins into a comic fantasy, in which the character DHH pens a play in protest and then unwittingly casts a white actor as the Asian lead. "Yellow Face" also explores the real-life investigation of Hwang's father, the first Asian American to own a federally chartered bank, and the espionage charges against physicist Wen Ho Lee. Adroitly combining the light touch of comedy with weighty political and emotional issues, "Hwang's lively and provocative cultural self-portrait lets nobody off the hook" ("The New York Times").

David Henry Hwang is the author of the Tony Award-winning "M. Butterfly," a finalist for the 1988 Pulitzer Prize. Other plays include "Golden Child," "FOB," "The Dance and the Railroad," and "Family Devotions"; his opera libretti include three works for composer Philip Glass. He was appointed by President Clinton to the President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities.

  

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Review: Yellow Face

User Review  - Kate Mereand-Sinha - Goodreads

To be clear, I saw this as a play, but enjoyed the play immensely. Read full review

Review: Yellow Face

User Review  - Buckeye, The Poisonous Tree Nut - Goodreads

This meta-, borderline farcical, frequently laugh-out-loud funny play also seriously examines the concept of race-- how people use it themselves, how it is used by others, and how, in the end, it may ... Read full review

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About the author (2008)

The son of immigrant Chinese parents, Hwang attended Stanford University and the Yale Drama School and has been a director and a teacher of playwriting. FOB (1981), which stands for "Fresh off the boat,"' explores the conflicts between two Chinese Americans and a Chinese exchange student still steeped in the customs and beliefs of the old world. It won an Obie Award in 1981. The Dance and the Railroad (1982) concerns an artist and his fellow workers who stage a strike to protest the inhuman conditions suffered by Chinese railroad workers in the American West in the nineteenth century. M Butterfly (1988), about the relationship between an American man and a Chinese transvestite, won the Tony Award as best play of the year. Maxine Hong Kingston wrote, "David Hwang has an ear for Chinatown English, the language of childhood and the subconscious, the language of emotion, the language of home.

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