Manual of Social Science: Being a Condensation of the "Principles of Social Science" of H.C. Carey, LL. D. (Google eBook)

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H. C. Baird, 1872 - Economics - 548 pages
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Page 63 - It is only, then, because land is not unlimited in quantity and uniform in quality, and because, in the progress of population, land of an inferior quality, or less advantageously situated, is called into cultivation, that rent is ever paid for the use of it. When, in the progress of society, land of the second degree of fertility is taken into cultivation, rent immediately commences on that of the first quality, and the amount of that rent will depend on the difference in the quality of these two...
Page 419 - Taxes on the sauce which pampers man's appetite, and the drug that restores him to health ; on the ermine which decorates the judge, and the rope which hangs the criminal ; on the poor man's salt, and the rich man's spice; on the brass nails of the coffin, and the ribands of the bride.
Page 28 - The natural price of labor is that price which is necessary to enable the laborers, one with another, to subsist and perpetuate their race, without either increase or diminution.
Page 528 - They were unenlightened by science, and unacquainted with that religion, which enjoins men to do unto others as they would that others should do unto them.
Page 410 - I know nothing that could, in this view, be said better, than " do unto others as ye would that others should do unto you...
Page 262 - Our wealthier planters, with greater means and no more skill, are buying out their poorer neighbors, extending their plantations, and adding to their slave force. The wealthy few, who are able to live on smaller profits, and to give their blasted fields some rest, are thus pushing off the many, who are merely independent.
Page 256 - But, though it were true that the immediate and certain effect of regulations controlling the competition of foreign with domestic fabrics was an increase of price, it is universally true that the contrary is the ultimate effect with every successful manufacture. When a domestic manufacture has attained to perfection, and has engaged in the prosecution of it a competent number of persons, it invariably becomes cheaper.
Page 295 - Accordingly we find, that, in every kingdom, into which money begins to flow in greater abundance than formerly, everything takes a new face : labour and industry gain life ; the merchant becomes more enterprising, the manufacturer more diligent and skilful, and even the farmer follows his plough with greater alacrity and attention.
Page 418 - ... that comes from abroad, or is grown at home — taxes on the raw material — taxes on every fresh value that is added to it by the industry of man...
Page 477 - The cause to which I allude is the constant tendency in all animated life to increase beyond the nourishment prepared for it.

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