Ulster Journal of Archaeology, Volume 7 (Google eBook)

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Ulster Archaeological Society, 1859 - Archaeology
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Page 30 - ANCIENT LAWS AND INSTITUTES OF WALES; comprising Laws supposed to be enacted by Howel the Good ; modified by subsequent Regulations under the Native Princes, prior to the Conquest by Edward the First ; and anomalous Laws, consisting principally of Institutions which, by the Statute of Ruddlan, were admitted to continue in force.
Page 213 - I observed a custom in all those Italian cities and towns through the which I passed, that is not used in any other country that I saw in my travels; neither do I think that any other nation of Christendom doth use it, but only Italy. The Italian, and also most strangers that are commorant in Italy, do always at their meals use a little fork when they cut their meat.
Page 141 - For to that holy wood is consecrate A virtuous well, about whose flowery banks The nimble-footed fairies dance their rounds By the pale moonshine, dipping oftentimes Their stolen children, so to make them free From dying flesh and dull mortality...
Page 245 - O'Brien, and having being loaded with rich presents, were sent back to Germany. With the money obtained from Ireland a more commodious site for a monastery was purchased on the western side of Ratisbon, and a building erected which the chronicle describes in glowing terms. " Now, be it known, that neither before nor since...
Page 141 - For in the love of those persons there seemed a purity and innocence that suited well their youth and the character of their beauty. Perhaps, indeed, on the girl's side, love sprung rather from those affections which the spring of life throws upward to the surface, as the spring of earth does its flowers...
Page 175 - Late late yestreen I saw the new moone, Wi the auld moone in hir arme, And I feir, I feir, my deir master, That we will cum to harme.
Page 209 - For so common were all sorts of treen stuff in old time, that a man should hardly find four pieces of pewter (of which one was peradventure a salt) in a good farmer's house...
Page 109 - Our Captains, and by their example (for it was otherwise painful), the common soldiers did cut down with their swords all the rebels...
Page 339 - Peace, factious monster ! born to vex the state, With wrangling talents form'd for foul debate : Curb that impetuous tongue ! nor, rashly vain And singly mad, asperse the sovereign reign.
Page 327 - Prestwich was not fortunate enough to find any specimens himself; but from the experience of M. de Perthes, and the evidence of the workmen, as well as from the condition of the specimens themselves, he is fully satisfied of the correctness of that gentleman's opinion, that they there also occur...

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