Love and Other Stories

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1st World Publishing, 2006 - Literary Collections - 272 pages
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THREE o'clock in the morning. The soft April night is looking in at my windows and caressingly winking at me with its stars. I can't sleep, I am so happy! My whole being from head to heels is bursting with a strange, incomprehensible feeling. I can't analyse it just now - I haven't the time, I'm too lazy, and there - hang analysis! Why, is a man likely to interpret his sensations when he is flying head foremost from a belfry, or has just learned that he has won two hundred thousand? Is he in a state to do it?"
  

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Contents

LOVE
7
LIGHTS
16
A STORY WITHOUT AN END
69
MARI DELLE
82
A LIVING CHATTEL
90
THE DOCTOR
145
TOO EARLY
154
THE COSSACK
162
A DAUGHTER OF ALBION
201
CHORISTERS
207
NERVES
215
A WORK OF ART
222
A JOKE
229
A COUNTRY COTTAGE
236
A BLUNDER
239
FAT AND THIN
242

ABORIGINES
171
AN INQUIRY
181
MARTYRS
185
THE LION AND THE SUN
194
THE DEATH OF A GOVERNMENT CLERK
246
A PINK STOCKING
251
AT A SUMMER VILLA
257
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov was born in the provincial town of Taganrog, Ukraine, in 1860. In the mid-1880s, Chekhov became a physician, and shortly thereafter he began to write short stories. Chekhov started writing plays a few years later, mainly short comic sketches he called vaudvilles. The first collection of his humorous writings, Motley Stories, appeared in 1886, and his first play, Ivanov, was produced in Moscow the next year. In 1896, the Alexandrinsky Theater in St. Petersburg performed his first full- length drama, The Seagull. Some of Chekhov's most successful plays include The Cherry Orchard, Uncle Vanya, and Three Sisters. Chekhov brought believable but complex personalizations to his characters, while exploring the conflict between the landed gentry and the oppressed peasant classes. Chekhov voiced a need for serious, even revolutionary, action, and the social stresses he described prefigured the Communist Revolution in Russia by twenty years. He is considered one of Russia's greatest playwrights. Chekhov contracted tuberculosis in 1884, and was certain he would die an early death. In 1901, he married Olga Knipper, an actress who had played leading roles in several of his plays. Chekhov died in 1904, spending his final years in Yalta.

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